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1. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Edward J. Furton, MA, PhD In This Issue
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2. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Colloquy
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3. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Richard M. Doerflinger Washington Insider
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essays
4. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Michelle N. Armendariz, Dorothy S. Martinez The Formation of the Maternal–Fetal Relationship: A Reflection on the Findings of Modern Medicine
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Previously conducted research has determined that physiological and psychophysiological communications evident during pregnancy are vital to the bond formed prenatally. These innate biological responses are further enhanced through psychophysiological factors, such as maternal prenatal stress, which attest to the essential communication between a mother and child in maternal–fetal attachment. A consideration of these factors is necessary with the increase in assisted reproductive technology, such as in vitro fertilization, surrogacy, and elective cesarean section, as this may affect the development of the maternal–fetal bond. It would be of benefit to the child, the mother, and every society to seek a more complete understanding of the intricate maternal–fetal bond, as the first friendship developed at the beginning of human life.
5. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Rev. Erik Lenhart, OFM Cap. People Born with Intersex Conditions: Pastoral and Bioethical Considerations
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There exist a variety of biological variations known as intersex conditions (ICs) or disorders of sex development (DSDs), which cause a per­son’s sex as male or female to be uncertain at birth. In the past several decades, cosmetic surgery aimed at “normalizing” the infant’s body has become an increasingly controversial treatment for an infant with an IC or DSD. While ICs and DSDs are not addressed directly by Catholic moral teaching, the Catholic Tradition has a number of tools (prudence, dignity, and hospitality) that can undergird a Catholic response to the suffering of people with ICs and DSDs and support improved medical, pastoral, and spiritual care for them and their families.
6. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Scott Lloyd Confronting the Contraceptive Mentality: Practical Strategies for Public Policy
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The statistics and studies speak clearly to a need for the pro-life movement to embrace opposition to contraception as a means of reducing our culture’s resort to abortion. What are some policies that may help us to confront the contraceptive orthodoxy in ways that are politically viable in the face of near-universal acceptance of contraception?
7. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Devan Stahl Moral Evaluations of Genetic Technologies: The Need for Catholic Social Doctrine
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The author argues that genetic technologies can never be fully sepa­rated from their eugenic ends. Because of this, the Church’s sexual ethic must be integrated with its social teaching to respond faithfully to ethical issues that arise with the use of genetic technologies. The author discusses, first, the Catholic opposition to eugenics from the turn of the twentieth century to the official papal condemnation of eugenics in 1930; next, the Church’s reaction to advances in DNA research in the 1950s and 60s; and finally, the shift from optimism to caution from the 1970s on, as new genetic technologies emerged in embryonic stem cell research, genetic counseling, and gene therapy. The author explores both the sources on which the Church has drawn in responding to genetic advances and the social issues that should prove fruitful for con­templation in the future.
articles
8. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
James Beauregard Sexuality, Dementia, and Catholic Long-Term Health Care
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Sexual activity between spouses in long-term care settings has received increasing attention recently. This article considers the special case of sexual activity between spouses in long-term care when one spouse has dementia. The complex and interrelated issues of aging, sexuality, and dementia are reviewed, first through examination of a recent court case. Then, issues of sexuality and aging, assessment of capacity and competency in dementia, and institutional responses to these situations are considered in light of Catholic bioethical tradition. The argument is made that Catholic long-term health care facilities ought to proactively address these issues, and some concrete suggestions are offered to address clinical care and risk management in these settings.
9. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Jordan Potter The Principle of Double Effect in End-of-Life Care
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In Catholic moral theology, the principle of double effect has been an effective normative tool for centuries, and it can be used to determine the ethicality of actions that contain both good and evil consequences. The principle of double effect is especially useful in end-of-life care, because many end-of-life treatment options inherently have both good and evil conse­quences. The principle of double effect can be used to make both practical and moral distinctions between the acts of euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, palliative sedation, and the withholding and withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment, which can be classified as either unjustified acts of killing or jus­tifiable acts of allowing to die.
10. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Deacon Timothy J. Egan, MD Informed Consent and the Roman Rite of Exorcism
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The biblical healings by Jesus and the primitive Church, the liturgical development of the Roman Rite of Exorcism, and the current practice of exorcists reflect a relationship between exorcism and the medical healing arts. Since mutuality characterizes all healer–sufferer interactions, informed consent is a central concept in physician–patient and exorcist–energumen relationships. Informed consent requires adequate information, decision-maker competence, and freedom from coercion. The determination of freedom from coercion is a particular challenge in exorcism, and guidelines for its assess­ment are discussed. While proxy decision making in medical care is generally driven by concerns over competence, foreseeable periods of demonic coercion will necessitate establishing proxies in exorcism. This places a moral duty on the exorcist to establish a substitute decision maker even in cases where the energumen would be considered competent. Discussion of this need through the process of informed consent builds the trust necessary for mutual decision making.
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11. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Pope Francis Address to Participants in the Plenary of the Pontifical Academy for Life
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12. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Pontifical Academy for Life Assistance to the Elderly and Palliative Care: Notes on the Workshop of the XXI General Assembly
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notes & abstracts
13. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
David A. Prentice Science
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14. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Science Abstracts
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15. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Greg F. Burke, MD Medicine
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16. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Medicine Abstracts
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17. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Christopher Kaczor Philosophy and Theology
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18. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Philosophy and Theology Abstracts
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book reviews
19. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Brendan Sweetman Why the Ultra-Darwinists and the Creationists Both Get It Wrong by Conor Cunningham
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20. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Justin Marie Brophy, OP Natura Pura: On the Recovery of Nature in the Doctrine of Grace by Steven A. Long
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