Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 1-19 of 19 documents


1. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Edward J. Furton, MA, PhD In This Issue
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
2. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Cynthia Jones-Nosacek, Kathleen M. Raviele, Les Ruppersberger, Anthony J. Caruso Colloquy
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
3. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
William L. Saunders Washington Insider
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
essays
4. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Gary Michael Atkinson Humanae vitae, Rape and the Zika Virus: Five Remarks
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Zika virus infection in a pregnant woman may cause severe brain malformations (microcephaly) and other birth defects in her child, and women living in or traveling to areas where it is endemic are urged to postpone pregnancy. Do the dangers posed by microcephaly justify the use of contraceptives under the principle of double effect? The author discusses ambiguities in Humanae vitae n. 14 and the claim that the use of contraceptives was approved by Pope Paul VI for nuns at risk of rape, and uses the principle of double effect to show that the answer to this question is no: the use of the anovulant pill by married couples for the purpose of preventing conception of a microcephalic child cannot be licit.
5. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Rev. Tadeusz Pacholczyk Suffering in Extremis and the Question of Palliative Sedation
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The difference between partially and completely eliminating an individual’s state of consciousness through the use of pharmacological agents seems particularly significant in the final phases of dying. Remediating pain and suffering by means of palliative sedation and the complete shutting down of consciousness raises ethical and spiritual concerns about categorically precluding participation in one’s own death. Given that, at the end of life, suffering almost invariably imposes itself on us in some form, we are challenged to reflect on how our dying process should appropriately incorporate and take cognizance of that suffering, even as we acknowledge the value and importance of palliative steps to remediate the suffering.
6. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Cara Buskmiller, MD Cryopreserved Embryo Adoption: Not Now, Maybe Later
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Cryopreservation and vitrification are techniques employed in fertility clinics to preserve embryos not used in in vitro fertilization cycles. These frozen embryos carry the dignity of persons, and it has been suggested that they could be unfrozen and adopted. Experts have offered divergent opinions on the legitimacy of this practice. This essay reviews the debate and offers a phenomenological description of embryo adoption considered in itself, as well as reflections on current circumstances which the author proposes make embryo adoption not only imprudent but illicit.
7. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Kent J. Lasnoski Are Cremation and Alkaline Hydrolysis Morally Distinct?
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This article morally assesses alkaline hydrolysis as a means of final bodily disposition. Arguing from the Catholic social and theological principles of human dignity, the doctrine of bodily resurrection, subsidiarity, and the common good, the author shows that, while alkaline hydrolysis has some advantages over burial and cremation (incineration), Catholic conferences should be encouraged to resist its legalization, provided they focus renewed energy on teaching the faithful about the significance of Christ’s victory, by the Resurrection, over the corruption of bodily death.
articles
8. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Gwyneth A. Spaeder, MD The Moral Obligation to Vaccinate: Autonomy and the Common Good
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The widespread availability of effective vaccines against life-threatening infections has been one of the greatest public health achievements. Unfounded but widely circulated safety concerns about some vaccines and ethical concerns about the derivation of others have caused a decline in the number of immunized individuals in the United States. Exploring distinctions between formal and material cooperation in evil provides reassurance that, in the absence of alternatives, Catholics may, in good conscience, receive vaccines originally derived from fetal tissue obtained from abortions. Examining Catholic teaching on the individual’s responsibility to the common good shows that, in the absence of medical contraindications, each person has a duty to receive currently recommended vaccinations.
9. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Elliott Louis Bedford The Reality of Institutional Conscience
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Opponents of conscience protections for Catholic Health Care institutions claim that, since institutions are not autonomous individuals, they are not subjects of conscience. Therefore, since institutional conscience does not exist, it does not deserve protection. In this article, the author demonstrates not only that institutional conscience exists but that it is an activity that pervades all human institutions. He provides a metaphysical sketch that illustrates how institutions are organic outgrowths of human social nature which mitigate the natural limitations of human individuals. Consequently, the activity of conscience is inherently a component of the life of human institutions.
10. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Paul Babcock Paying Workers as if People Mattered
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This article examines capitalist, socialist, and solidarist wage theories to determine which theory is best suited to our health care system. It argues for solidarist wage theory, which is based on Catholic social teaching, relying on the notion that wages are inexorably entwined with providing for oneself and one’s family as a consequence of the Fall. It then discusses several unique features of health care wages that threaten the sustainability of the system, and explores how application of the solidarist model can address these problems.
verbatim
11. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Archbishop Bernardito Auza Position of the Holy See on the UN Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS June 8, 2016
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
notes & abstracts
12. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
David A. Prentice Science
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
13. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
David J. Ramsey, MD Medicine
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
14. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Christopher Kaczor Philosophy and Theology
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
book reviews
15. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Harrison Denn The Theology of Marriage: Personalism, Doctrine, and Canon Law
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
16. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Rev. Erik Lenhart, OFM Cap Intersex, Theology, and the Bible: Troubling Bodies in Church, Text, and Society
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
17. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
James Beauregard Human Dignity and Bioethics: From Worldviews to the Public Square
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
18. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Thomas P. Sheahen The Great Partnership: Science, Religion, and the Search for Meaning
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
19. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Books Received
view |  rights & permissions | cited by