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Displaying: 1-17 of 17 documents


1. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Edward J. Furton In This Issue
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2. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Greg Schleppenbach Washington Insider
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essays
3. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Teresa Yao Can We Limit a Right to Physician-Assisted Suicide?
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In each US state that has legalized physician-assisted suicide, the law stipulates that it may be pursued only by terminally ill patients with a prognosis of six months or less to live. It appears that this requirement makes euthanasia laws more palatable for the general public. However, this restriction is not justified by the reasoning commonly used to support assisted suicide. The desire to alleviate suffering and uphold personal autonomy should require that assisted suicide be allowed for individuals who do not have a six-month prognosis. The author concludes that a moral contradiction arises for individuals who support limited assisted suicide but oppose unrestricted suicide because acceptance of the former logically leads to acceptance of the latter.
4. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Brother Ignatius Perkins, OP, RN Accompanying the Destitute and Dying: The Character of the Clinician and the Healing Relationship after Treatment Ends
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The experiences of clinicians who care for the sick and dying after withdrawal of treatment are rarely documented. This may be because these narratives, which offer insight into the intentionality and character of the clinician, do not lend themselves to clinical reports. The experience of palliative care touches clinicians in different ways and often confronts them with complex ethical dilemmas about care and treatment. This article explores the character of the clinician in relation to the telos of medicine and the experience of accompanying the dying after withdrawal of treatment.
5. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Alan Vincelette Maternal–Fetal Conflict and Periviability
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A recent statement of consensus held that the principle of double effect would allow the induction of a previable fetus in order to eliminate a grave and present danger to the life of a mother suffering from peripartum cardiomyopathy. The author responds to this declaration, points out some limitations preventing it from being a vehicle for broader agreement, and offers an alternative, namely, medical induction of labor in cases of maternal–fetal vital conflict can be justified if the fetus has at least a fair chance of survival. This support of induction in cases of periviability considers the interests of both fetus and mother and, unlike the earlier consensus statement, can be defended by those who hold that one’s moral intention includes both the ultimate and proximate ends, or the immediate consequences of one’s act.
6. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Charles Robertson Navigating an Impasse in the Embryo Adoption Debate: A Response to Elizabeth Rex
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This essay responds to an article by Elizabeth Bothamley Rex titled “The Magisterial Liceity of Embryo Adoption” (NCBQ, Winter 2015), specifically to Rex’s critique that his objections to the liceity of embryo transfer distort magisterial documents. He then draws out the implications of the differences between his view and Rex’s on the relation between maternity and pregnancy. The essay concludes by pointing out that, if they are to change their minds, opponents of embryo adoption need to be convinced that it is morally licit to impregnate, or “introduce an order to birth,” in a woman by means other than the marriage act.
articles
7. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Ann M. Heath Advance Directives to Withhold Oral Food and Water in Dementia: A Surrogate’s Moral Obligations
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Euthanasia advocates have recently begun counseling people to create advance directives calling for oral food and water to be withheld if the person reaches a certain stage of dementia. The author shows that these directives are in fact requests for euthanasia, and they leave vulnerable people subject to poor-quality care. Both surrogate decision makers (health care proxies) and Catholic institutions have a moral obligation not to implement such directives, and surrogates, rather than withdrawing as proxies, have a moral obligation to advocate for the life and proper care of the incompetent person. Finally, the author argues that society is morally culpable if it does not strongly resist euthanasia in all its forms. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 16.3 (Autumn 2016): 421–434.
8. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Barbara Golder, MD, E.Wesley Ely, MD, John Raphael, Ashley K. Fernandes, MD, Annmarie Hosie, RN Assisted Nutrition and Hydration as Supportive Care during Illness: Bedside Application of Catholic Moral Teaching
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Confusion surrounds Catholic teaching on the use of assisted nutrition and hydration (ANH), specifically the question of when, if ever, its refusal or removal is ethical. This paper focuses on two often-neglected considerations: (1) the relationship between means (feeding) and mechanism (how the food is delivered), and (2) an assessment of proportionality of the mechanism from the patient’s perspective. The authors draw on two critical principles of Catholic moral teaching: only ordinary means are required, and proportionality is subject to the perspective of the patient, not just that of experts or the culture. The mechanisms that provide food and water have distinct benefits and burdens. Their proportionality is properly subject to analysis by the patient or surrogate, who determines which mechanism is acceptable in the patient’s situation.
9. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Janet E. Smith, John S. Grabowski, J. Budziszewski, Maria Fedoryka Self-Gift: The Heart of Humanae vitae
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It is possible to defend the Church’s teaching that contraception is incompatible with God’s plan for sexuality in many different ways. This essay sketches the fundamental views of reality common to all the defenses and the main lines of the most prominent defenses, some based on natural law (of which there are several versions), on the theology of the body, and on the physical, psychological, and social consequences of the use of contraception. While all the defenses have merit, the argument based on the recognition that sexual intercourse is meant to be a complete self-gift has a special power of its own.
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10. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Christian Medical and Dental Association Transgender Identification
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notes & abstracts
11. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
David A. Prentice Science
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12. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
John S. Sullivan, MD Medicine
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13. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Christopher Kaczor Philosophy and Theology
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book reviews
14. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Rev. Robert E. Hurd, SJ, MD Conscience in Context: Historical and Existential Perspectives
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15. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Ralph A. Capone, MD Joy and Suffering: My Life with ALS
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16. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Rev. Richard Benson, CM Bioethics and the Human Goods: An Introduction to Natural Law Bioethics
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17. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Sara Coverstone, RN Embracing Christian Sex in a Pagan World
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