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1. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Preface
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selected essays
2. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Sohail H. Hashmi Cultivating a Liberal Islamic Ethos, Building an Islamic Civil Society
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MUSLIM STATES HAVE BEEN CHARACTERIZED AS SUFFERING FROM A "democratic deficit." A wide-ranging debate has been taking place for many years on whether Islam is somehow to blame for the troubled history of liberal democracy in the Muslim world. This essay argues that if liberal democratic polities are to develop in Muslim countries, then nurturing civil society is a necessary first step. How can Islamic ethics help or hinder this process?
3. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
John Kelsay RESPONSE TO: "Cultivating a Liberal Islamic Ethos, Building an Islamic Civil Society"
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4. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Dov Nelkin RESPONSE TO: "Cultivating a Liberal Islamic Ethos, Building an Islamic Civil Society"
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5. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Jonathan E. Brockopp RESPONSE TO: "Cultivating a Liberal Islamic Ethos, Building an Islamic Civil Society"
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6. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Irene Oh RESPONSE TO: "Cultivating a Liberal Islamic Ethos, Building an Islamic Civil Society"
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7. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Sohail H. Hashmi RESPONSE TO REPONSES TO: "Cultivating a Liberal Islamic Ethos, Building an Islamic Civil Society"
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8. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Joe Pettit The Spoil of the Poor Is in Your Houses: Profits and Prophets in a Disrupted Society
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THIS ESSAY CONSIDERS THE ROLE OF THE PROPHET IN CONTEMPORARY public policy debate. After identifying some problems that contemporary appeals to the prophets often encounter, the essay moves into an analysis of the Babylonian and Egyptian contexts out of which the Israelites and the Hebrew prophets emerged. A consideration of all three contexts shows that the central prophetic concern is a disruption of the divinely established social order that is most clearly indicated by the rich getting richer at the expense of the poor. The essay then explores how this prophetic context can be understood in light of ethical appeals to the common good. Finally, the essay applies the notion of disruption in the social order to two issues of public policy: affordable housing and the stock market.
9. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Virginia W. Landgraf Competing Narratives of Property Rights and Justice for the Poor: Toward a Nonannihilationist Approach to Scarcity and Efficiency
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ULRICH DUCHROW AND FRANZ HINKELAMMERT'S PROPOSALS AGAINST private property contain a structural weakness analogous to that of which they accuse John Locke: an inability to attribute agency to their opponents. Analysis of antineoliberal and neoliberal narratives of economic history shows that they are mirror images of each other in what they consider fixed or changeable in life. The likelihood that each narrative contains partial truths means that faithful Christian economic ethics are best grounded in a theology according agency to all, acknowledging the universality of sin, and proclaiming transcendent hope.
10. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Patrick T. McCormick Volunteers and Incentives: Buying the Bodies of the Poor
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IN RESPONSE TO A SPREADING RECRUITMENT CRISIS AMONG THE ARMY, National Guard, and Army Reserve during the first half of 2005, the Pentagon sought to bolster combat volunteers for Iraq by offering a wide array of enlistment and reenlistment bonuses. This use of financial incentives to recruit bodies for the Iraq war echoed earlier White House efforts to induce nations to join the "coalition of the willing" by offering aid and trade packages, and paralleled the Pentagon's decision to outsource twenty thousand military jobs in Iraq to private military firms. When democratic nations seek to garner support for unpopular wars by offering financial incentives to those who serve in combat, they run the risk of exploiting the poor and undermining the moral legitimacy of their authority to wage war.