Already a subscriber? Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 1-9 of 9 documents


1. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Michael Jerryson, Introduction
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
articles
2. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Kelly Denton-Borhaug, Sacrificial U.S. War-culture: Cognitive Dissonance and the Absence of Self-Awareness
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This article explores the potent sacrificial sacred canopy that shrouds rhetoric, practices, and institutions of post-9/11 war-culture in the United States. Analyzing examples from popular culture, presidential rhetoric, and military history, especially Andrew Bacevich’s America’s War for the Greater Middle East: A Military History, I show how the depth and breadth of sacrificial rhetoric and logic result in a highly disciplined practice of framing and decision-making about militarism and war in the United States. Sacrificial linguistic patterns profoundly ignite and transcendentalize militarization and war, even while simultaneously mitigating conscious awareness, concern, and protest.
3. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Iselin Frydenlund, Buddhist Militarism Beyond Texts: The Importance of Ritual During the Sri Lankan Civil War
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This article addresses Buddhist militarism by exploring monastic-military ritual interactions during the Sri Lankan civil war, lasting from 1983 to 2009. Much has been written on the importance of Buddhism to Sinhala nationalism, the redefinition of the Buddhist monastic role in response to colonialism and the modernization process, as well as the development of a Buddhist just-war ideology. While these perspectives in various ways emphasize the importance of the Buddhist monastic order in pushing forward a Sinhala Buddhist nationalist agenda, little attention has been paid to the performative aspects of Buddhist militarism. Based on ethnographic data gathered during the Norwegian-facilitated peace talks (2000–2008), this article shows how rituals became crucial in conveying support to the state’s military efforts without compromising religious authority. By looking at Buddhist monastic ritual interaction in military institutions, this paper argues that the acceptance of the use of warfare is less anchored in systematized just-war thinking than the term “Buddhist just-war ideology” seems to suggest. Rather, through an anthropological approach to Buddhism and violence, this article shows that the term “Buddhist implicit militarism” better captures the rationale behind the broad monastic engagement with military institutions beyond minority positions of radical Buddhist militancy during a given “exception” in history. The essay concludes that monastic-military ritual interaction is a social field in which this “implicit militarism” is most clearly articulated.
4. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Ankur Barua, Encountering Violence in Hindu Universes: Situating the Other on Vedic Horizons
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
A study of Hindu engagements with violence which have been structured by scriptural themes reveals that violence has been regulated, enacted, resisted, negated or denied in complex ways. Disputes based on Vedic orthodoxy were channeled, in classical India, through the mythical frameworks of gods clashing with demons, and later in the medieval centuries this template was extended to the Muslim foreigners who threatened the Brahmanical socio-religious orders. In the modern period, the electoral mechanisms of colonial modernity spurred Hindu anxieties about a weakened nation which would die out in the face of Muslim solidarity, and various Hindu organizations began to increasingly draw on motifs from the Vedas, Bhagavad-gītā, and other texts to speak of a martial Hindu nation. These two moments—the articulation of the boundaries of the robust Hindu nation and the projection of the Muslim as the enemy lurking at the gates—have been integral to the shaping of Hindu cultural nationalism by several key thinkers and political activists. Thus, the forms of violence associated with Hindu universes should be placed within their dynamic socio-historical contexts where Hindus have interpreted, engaged with, and acted on a range of scriptural texts both to generate violent solidarities and to speak of peace. A study of these phenomena alongside some Christian theological attempts to legitimize, valorize or transcend violence from within scriptural horizons points to the complex conceptual terrain encompassed by the conjunction in “religion and violence.”
5. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
James Ponniah, Communal Violence in India: Exploring Strategies of its Nurture and Negation in Contemporary Times
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This article, based on the fieldwork done at two places in India, namely Kandhamal in Odisha and Mangalore in Karnataka, not only investigates different forms of anti-Christian narratives produced by the Hindu extremists to legitimize and perpetuate communal violence but also draws one’s attention to the Christian response that delegitimizes such narratives and arrests its reception by the common public. The anti-Christian and anti-minority narrative of the Hindutva camp is founded upon a single meta-narrative that India is a Hindu nation. This narrative—which is constructed by the right-wing Hindu groups for the last three decades in Independent India—not only denies, by default, equal citizenship to Christians, but also portrays them as anti-national, and thus legitimizes violence against them. To this challenge, Christians in India respond by reinventing their national citizenship through political activism and socio-economic engagements to build a more mature secular Indian state, which would become less and less vulnerable to religious violence in India. The essay is divided into two parts. While the first part deals with multiple ways through which communal violence is provoked in these two states, the second part focuses on how Christians of India respond to this new reality of polarization and repression.
book reviews
6. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
David Cook, The ISIS Apocalypse: The History, Strategy and Doomsday Vision of the Islamic State. By William McCants
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
7. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Judy Ledgerwood, Deathpower: Buddhism’s Ritual Imagination in Cambodia. By Erik W. Davis
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
8. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
David Frankfurter, The Invention of Satanism. By Asbjørn Dyrendal, James Lewis, and Jesper Peterson
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
9. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Gregory D. Alles, Pentecostals, Proselytization, and Anti-Christian Violence in Contemporary India. By Chad Bauman
view |  rights & permissions | cited by