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Displaying: 1-10 of 182 documents


1. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
James R. Lewis Religion and Terrorism: Introduction to Journal of Religion and Violence 7.1
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articles
2. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Heather S. Gregg Understanding the “Trinamic”: A Net Assessment of ISIS
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Violent non-state actors are of particular security concern today and will continue to be for the foreseeable future. This article uses a net assessment approach to analyze the threat posed by religiously motivated, violent non-state actors and how governments can better understand these threats, their popular support, and how to minimize their effects. It proposes that the goal of governments should be to “win” critical populations away from non-state actors that require their support to survive. Using ISIS as an example, the article demonstrates that a purely enemy-centric approach to countering violent non-state actors that use religion is likely to alienate critical populations whose support is necessary to defeating these threats.
3. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Per-Erik Nilsson Burka Songs 2.0: The Discourse on Islamic Terrorism and the Politics of Extremization in Sweden
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This article analyzes a minor event in the city of Gothenburg in Sweden that rose from being a local scandal to become a national mediatized political affair. It is argued that local articulations of the discourse on Islamic terrorism function as a way of regulating access to the public sphere by the politics of extremization, i.e., the performative identification of certain Muslim subjects as threats to the established order by their very presence in the public sphere. It is also argued that the polarization of political debate brought about by the mediatization of politics, coupled with the dichotomous logic of the discourse on Islamic terrorism, poses serious challenges to any sound and deliberate political debate.
4. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
James R. Lewis Monolithic Inferences: Misinterpreting AUM Shinrikyo
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In the study of religion and terrorism, one of the most familiar incidents is the Sarin gas attack on the Tokyo subway system in 1995. With the execution of Shoko Asahara and his close associates in the summer of 2018, it would appear that the last chapter in this tragic tale has finally been written. I would argue, however, that there are still lessons to be learned from this event. In the present article, I describe the complexity of the epistemic situation in which I found myself when I finally met AUM Shinrikyo in the spring of 1995. In addition to misunderstandings arising from monolithic inferences regarding AUM’s membership, I came to feel that certain anomalous items of information were swept under the rug—information that hinted at a more complex array of factors influencing AUM Shinrikyo and the subway attack.
book reviews
5. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
David B. Gray If You Meet the Buddha on the Road: Buddhism, Politics, and Violence. Michael Jerryson
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6. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Candace S. Alcorta Elements of Ritual and Violence. Margo Kitts
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7. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Margaret Cormack Martyrdom, Self-Sacrifice and Self-Immolation: Religious Perspectives on Suicide. Edited by Margo Kitts
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8. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Mohammed M. Hafez Caravan of Martyrs: Sacrifice and Suicide Bombing in Afghanistan. David B. Edwards
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9. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
John Shean Making Sense of Old Testament Genocide: Christian Interpretations of Passages. Christian Hofreiter
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10. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
John Soboslai Competing Fundamentalisms: Violent Extremism in Christianity, Islam, and Hinduism. Sathianathan Clarke
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