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Displaying: 1-9 of 9 documents


1. The Journal of Philosophy, Science & Law: Volume > 10 > Issue: 6
Randall Mayes The Modern Olympics & Post-Modern Athletics: A Clash in Values
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While the overwhelming majority of professions do not regulate the use of performance enhancements, athletics has become a lightning rod. Analysis of the current policies regulating athletic enhancements reveals that drawing the line on what is permitted is an ethically and politically arbitrary process, and sport governing bodies hold athletes to a different standard. The World Anti-Doping Agency uses “the spirit of sport” as criteria for banning enhancements while recent findings in genomics reveals the spirit of being human is to take advantage of what is available for survival. These contradictions question the reasoning and validity of the current regulations of athletic enhancements.
2. The Journal of Philosophy, Science & Law: Volume > 10 > Issue: 5
Gary Miller Cognition Enhancing Drugs: Just Say Yes?
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3. The Journal of Philosophy, Science & Law: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Alexander Murphy-Nakhnikian A Review of Todd E. Feinberg’s From Axons to Identity: Neurological Explorations of the Nature of the Self
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4. The Journal of Philosophy, Science & Law: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Pierre Darriulat Knowledge and Mystery: The Impact of Contemporary Science on Metaphysics
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The article, meant to address philosophers and scientists as well as the interested layman, expresses the views of a physicist on the strong impact that contemporary science has on the traditional approach to metaphysics, implying an in-depth revision of many concepts that have been happily used for centuries. The implications of taking seriously the main message of contemporary neurosciences – there is nothing else than interacting atoms in our brains – are explored. Free will, and its reconciliation with scientific determinism, is used as an illustration. Contemporary science has shed new light on the circularity of knowledge and allows for a clearer separation between science and metaphysics, between knowledge and religious beliefs. At the same time it reveals the fundamental inability of knowledge at unravelling mysteries such as knowing why the world exists, rather than nothing.
5. The Journal of Philosophy, Science & Law: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Roger Chao Does Singer's “Famine, Affluence and Morality” Inescapably Commit Us to His Conclusion?
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6. The Journal of Philosophy, Science & Law: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Sean Noah Walsh Masters of Hyperreality: Injustice in the Discourse of Deconstruction
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7. The Journal of Philosophy, Science & Law: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Bernard E. Rollin Animal Research, Animal Welfare, and the Three R’s
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8. The Journal of Philosophy, Science & Law: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Eric Adams The Flexibility of Description and NESS Causation
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9. The Journal of Philosophy, Science & Law: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Walter J. Riker A Review of J. Angelo Corlett’s Race, Rights, and Justice
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