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Displaying: 1-4 of 4 documents


1. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 113 > Issue: 12
Wade Munroe Words on Psycholinguistics
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David Kaplan’s analysis of the factors that determine what words (if any) someone has used in a given utterance requires that a speaker can only use a word through producing an utterance performed with a particular, related intention directed at speaking that word. This account, or any that requires a speaker to have an intention to utter a specific word, proves inconsistent with models of speech planning in psycholinguistics as informed by data on slips-of-the-tongue. Kaplan explicitly aims to formulate a theory of words that elides the details of the processes responsible for speech planning and production. Though it may superficially seem that the picture of speech planning and production offered by psycholinguistics can add no insight into our analysis—on closer inspection—we find a rich body of empirical data that should be integrated into any viable account of what words someone has used in a given utterance.
2. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 113 > Issue: 12
Andrea Iacona Two Notions of Logical Form
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This paper claims that there is no such thing as the correct answer to the question of what is logical form: two significantly different notions of logical form are needed to fulfil two major theoretical roles that pertain respectively to logic and semantics. The first part of the paper outlines the thesis that a unique notion of logical form fulfils both roles, and argues that the alleged best candidate for making it true is unsuited for one of the two roles. The second part spells out a considerably different notion that is free from that problem, although it does not fit the other role. As it will be suggested, each of the two notions suits at most one role, so the uniqueness thesis is ungrounded.
3. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 113 > Issue: 12
New Books
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4. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 113 > Issue: 12
Index to Volume CXIII
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