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1. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 114 > Issue: 10
Kit Fine Form
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We pose a puzzle for forms and show how it might be solved by appeal to the theory of arbitrary objects. We also discuss how the resulting account of forms relates to issues concerning structural universals and the nature of abstraction.
2. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 114 > Issue: 10
Rachael Wiseman What Am I and What Am I Doing?
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There is a deep connection between Anscombe’s argument that ‘I’ is not a referring expression and Intention’s account of practical knowledge and knowledge without observation. The assumption that the so-called “no-reference thesis” can be resisted while the account of action set out in her book INTENTION is embraced is based on a misunderstanding of the argument of “The First Person” and the status of its conclusion; removing that misunderstanding helps to illuminate the concept of practical knowledge and brings into view a novel account of the relation between self-consciousness, agency, and first-person thought.
3. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 114 > Issue: 10
Stephen Maitzen Substantial Change: Continuous, Consistent, Objective
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Since antiquity, philosophers have struggled to describe the instant of change in continuous time in a way that is both consistent with classical logic and also objective rather than arbitrary. A particularly important version of this problem arises, I argue, for substantial change, that is, any case in which a metaphysical substance comes into or goes out of existence. I then offer and defend an analysis of the instant of substantial change in continuous time that is consistent with classical logic and objective rather than arbitrary. My key assumption is that, necessarily, every substance ages at every instant at which it exists, from which I conclude that no substance has a first or a last instant of its existence if time is continuous. I also suggest that my solution offers some support for endurantism about substances.
book reviews
4. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 114 > Issue: 10
Ernest Sosa Duncan Pritchard: Epistemic Angst: Radical Skepticism and the Groundlessness of Our Believing
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5. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 114 > Issue: 10
New Books
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