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1. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
John Hooker In This Volume
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teaching and research articles
2. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Aviva Geva Ethical Aspects of Dual Coding: Implications for Multimedia Ethics Training in Business
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Rapid development of e-learning courses for ethics-and-compliance programs led to substantial success in producing engaging multimedia training toolkits aimed at breaking through barriers of indifference and distrust by combining learning with fun. However, a pleasant training experience is no guarantee of its ultimate success in improving organizational ethics. Drawing on Paivio’s Dual Coding Theory, this paper presents a model for evaluating multimedia learning from a moral viewpoint. The main argument advanced in the paper is that entertaining multimedia training modules, as commonly offered in the business world, may deliver an unintended message which runs counter to the very goal of ethics training. The Rocked or Shocked? videogame—a multimedia-based ethics training module—will serve as a case study for detecting the complicated role of entertainment in ethics training and examining the ethical meanings conveyed through the pictorial/event channel. The paper concludes with recommendations for the design of multimedia ethics training.
3. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
José Luis Fernández Fernández, Anna Bajo Sanjuán The Presence of Business Ethics and CSR in the Higher Education Curricula for Executives: The Case of Spain
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This paper analyses the study plans and programmes offered in Spain to present and future businesspeople and executives in the academic year 2009-10. These offerings represent business administration studies in all Spanish universities, as well as postgraduate programmes taught by the universities themselves and/or other business schools. This is of special relevance because there are few data for assessing how our executives are trained, even though such data areessential to any attempt to improve corporate performance. Clearly, business ethics, corporate social responsibility, and other core courses related to sustainability can and should contribute to this end. But the actual results are not very promising: these essential courses are offered in a minority of postgraduate programmes, and they barely exist at the undergraduate level. We consider it long overdue that academic institutions explore the inherent value of this type of training and seriously reconsider alternative course planning for their students.
4. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Maisarah Mohamed Saat, Stacey Porter, Gordon Woodbine An Exploratory Study of the Impact of Malaysian Ethics Education on Ethical Sensitivity
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This paper examines the effectiveness of ethics education provided by Malaysian universities. A total of 264 accounting students attending ethics courses in public and private universities responded to a pre and post questionnaire (treatment group) and another 57 students who did not complete an ethics course (control group) were included for comparative purposes. Statistical analysis reveals that business ethics courses are effective as students demonstrate higherlevel of ethical sensitivity upon completion of the course. In contrast, the control group students demonstrate lower levels of ethical sensitivity. Students in the “good” and “average” academic performance category, females, and Malay students, gained most from an ethics education. Students from public universities were also found to benefit more than their private university counterparts. The results contribute to the dearth of research in this area and present a case for introducing compulsory business ethics courses in all Malaysian universities offering accounting programs.
5. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Jessica McManus Warnell An Undergraduate Business Ethics Curriculum: Learning and Moral Development Outcomes
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The study explores outcomes associated with a business ethics curriculum over an intervention with undergraduate business students—completion of a required course in the conceptual foundations of business ethics. A case study analysis provided results that were coded using a rubric based on the Four Component Model of Morality and address development of moral reasoning capacity. Initial findings indicate statistically significant change in each of four categoriesof analysis of the case response, related to the moral development scale. Findings are useful in assessing outcomes, suggesting curriculum design and providing information for further research of moral reasoning with business students.
6. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Morris G. Danielson, Amy F. Lipton Ethics and the Introductory Finance Course
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This paper discusses how the teaching of ethics can be interwoven with the most basic concept in finance: time value of money. Although valuation formulas yield precise numerical answers, they require many assumptions about future economic conditions. If decision makers use false information or erroneous assumptions, they will arrive at an incorrect value estimate, even if the calculations are performed correctly. Thus, the valuation process can be manipulated byunscrupulous participants. This concept is illustrated with references to recent events. Examples appropriate for classroom use are included in an appendix.
case studies
7. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Jenny Mead, Regina Wentzel Wolfe, Akira Saito, Daryl Koehn Snow Brand Milk Products (A): Assessing the Possibility for Revitalization
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This three-case series examines the dilemma that faced the Japanese company Snow Brand Milk Products (SBM) as it confronted the task of rebuilding and revitalization after a series of scandals, many self-induced, had threatened the company’s future. The A case begins in spring 2002 when leading consumer activist Nobuko Hiwasa was invited to join Snow Brand’s board of directors. The CEO wanted her to assist in SBM’s revitalization efforts, which were beingimplemented in the wake of two recent scandals—contaminated milk and beef mislabeling—that had almost brought down the venerable company. Hiwasa was ambivalent about taking on this Herculean task. Was the company sincere in wanting to reform and revitalize? Would the board take her seriously? Was her presence to be mere publicity-driven window dressing? How would fellow consumer advocates view her if she accepted the position? This case details the history of Snow Brand Milk Products and the missteps and scandals that plagued it in the 1990s and early part of the decade that followed, and includes Hiwasa’s decision-making process as she considers whether to join the board of a company that has been badly tainted by scandal.
8. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Jenny Mead, Regina Wentzel Wolfe, Akira Saito, Daryl Koehn Snow Brand Milk Products (B): Reform and Revitalization Efforts
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The B case jumps ahead several years and outlines the turnaround efforts SBM undertook to address its grave missteps: shifting to a consumer-oriented, integrity-focused management style; providing greater transparency and communication; and establishing a corporate ethics committee and a Snow Brands Code of Conduct. In June 2002, after much consideration and reflection on Snow Brand’s issues (as outlined in the A case), Hiwasa joined its new board as its sole outside director, serving as the impetus for the changes the company made. Her appointment indicated SBM was indeed serious about reform and revitalization.
9. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Jenny Mead, Regina Wentzel Wolfe, Akira Saito, Daryl Koehn Snow Brand Milk Products (C): 2009—Remaining Challenges
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In the C case, the turnaround at SBM has been effected. Most significant is the company’s realization that it exists to serve the consumer and, through that service, the broader society. This brief case outlines the successes Hiwasa pushed SBM management to accomplish and introduces the challenges the company faced in 2009: primarily, continuing to build its corporate social responsibility approach and addressing environmental and social issues.
10. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Julian Friedland A Fair Wage? Capping Executive Compensation
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This case study highlights some of the latest research on setting executive compensation at ethical levels. The board of directors of Spade’s, a mid-size U.S. hardware chain, considers altering the pay package of its incoming CEO to best align his interests with those of shareholders and stakeholders. Students are invited to consider various options on current trends, which seem attractive and convincing on the surface, but might present certain risks over the longer term. Five compensation components are analyzed, namely, salary capping, pay for performance, bonus scales, stock option parameters, and severance package.
11. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Tim Manuel An Ethics Role-Playing Case: Stockholders versus Stakeholders
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12. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Tim Manuel An Ethics Role-Playing Case: Stockholders versus Stakeholders Case Discussion
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This paper discusses a role playing ethics case suitable for business students in which participants must balance shareholder and stakeholder concerns. Students take on the role of operations manager and are challenged to consider the effects of their choices on the local society as they balance the demands of stockholders, employees, and family when the concerns of the groups come into conflict. The exercise helps students understand the need to consider the ethicalcomponents of business decisions and the difficulties of handling values in conflict. Students learn more about their own values through playing the role of manager. Suggested discussion questions are provided. This note also reviews some of the extant literature on the goals of stakeholder versus shareholder wealth and the role of ethics, and it discusses areas of common ground between the stakeholder/shareholder theories.
themed section - “linking ethics and aesthetics: teaching and learning business ethics with the arts”
13. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Sandra Waddock Finding Wisdom Within—The Role of Seeing and Reflective Practice in Developing Moral Imagination, Aesthetic Sensibility, and Systems Understanding
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This paper explored the linkages among moral imagination, systems understanding, and aesthetic sensibility as related to the emergence (eventually) of wisdom. I develop a conceptual framework that links these capacities to wisdom through the capacity to “see” moral and ethical issues, which I argue is related to “the good”, to see a realistic understanding of systems in which the observer is embedded, or “the true”, and to appreciate the aesthetic qualities associated with a system or situation, or “the beautiful”. The relationship between the good, the true, and the beautiful is used to argue that all three types of seeing are building blocks for achievement of wisdom. The paper then briefly explores some of the ways that these capacities can potentially be incorporated into the classroom.
14. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Patricia H. Werhane The Centrality of “Seeing As” and a Question about “Truth”: A Response to Sandra Waddock
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15. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Christopher Michaelson Business and/as/of the Humanities
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In their prevailing conceptions, business is interested, whereas the humanities provoke disinterested attention in value for its own sake. Applying Danto’s and/as/of structure to Freeman’s documentary film, Leadership and Theater, this paper outlines the business of the humanities (economic value), depicts the value of the humanities to business ethics education (ethical value), and asks how cultivating an attitude of business as a humanity (aesthetic value) might influence our students’ views of business and business ethics. Regarding business disinterestedly could mean challenging whether interestedness is an essential characteristic of business. The humanities can cultivate an appreciation for what is valuable in itself, in spite of the potential absence of measurableeconomic value.
16. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Daryl Koehn Ethics, Morality, and Art in the Classroom: Positive and Negative Relations
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Scholars are increasingly interested in possible relationships between aesthetics and ethics and in the pedagogical value of art. This paper considers some specific works of art and explores their multi-faceted relation to ethics and morality. I argue that art has both positive and negative relationships to ethics and morality (which I distinguish in a very rough way as the paper progresses). Art works of various sorts may productively be used in the business ethics classroom,but instructors need to keep in mind the multivalent relationship between art, on the one hand, and ethics and morality on the other.
book reviews
17. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Tara L. Ceranic An Introduction to Business Ethics, 3rd Edition
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18. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
Dawn R. Elm Managing Business Ethics: Straight Talk About How to Do It Right, 5th Edition
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19. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
John Fraedrich Above the Board: How Ethical CEOs Create Honest Corporations
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20. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 7
John Fraedrich The Ethical Executive
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