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1. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
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2. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Eric James Morelli Insight and the Subject
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Frederick E. Crowe claims that Lonergan’s thought underwent a radical transformation after the publication of Insight. In several recent articles he argues that inthe course of dealing with a problem of insight into insight and a problem of the subject as subject, Lonergan was on the verge of articulating a problem of the heteromorphism of subjectivity. I argue that Crowe’s claims depend on an uncritically selective and hermeneutically insensitive use of sources and a nest of ambiguities. By distinguishing the various senses in which Lonergan uses the terms insight into and image in Insight, I show that Lonergan’s thought did not undergo the development that Crowe claims it did. A dialectical reflection on Crowe’s arguments reveals that their ambiguity arises from Crowe’s implicit adoptionof a form of cognitional atomism.
3. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Andreea Mihali Sum Res Volans: The Centrality of Willing for Descartes
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This paper challenges the standard interpretation of Descartes’s view that the essence of the mind is thinking. Most commentators take the essence of the mind to be constituted by thoughts as objects of awareness. By contrast, the position defended here is that willing is as much part of the essence of the Cartesian meditating mind as awareness. Willing is not just a type of thought, but whenever thinking occurs it invariably involves both awareness and willing. To substantiate the claim that Descartes could not separate willing from the one meditating, the paper examines the role of the will at all the key junctures of the Meditations: the cogito, the clarity and distinctness of some of our ideas, the arguments for God’s existence, and the propensity to believe that our ideas of sensible things comefrom those things.
4. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Alan R. Rhoda Peirce and Lonergan on Inquiry and the Pragmatics of Inference
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Drawing on the work of Charles Peirce and Bernard Lonergan, I argue (1) that inferences are essentially related to a process of inquiry, (2) that there is a normative pattern to this process, one in which each of Peirce’s three distinct types of inference—abductive, deductive, and inductive—plays a distinct cognitive role, and (3) that each type of inference answers a distinct type of question and thereby resolves a distinct kind of interrogative intentionality.
5. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Gaven Kerr Kant’s Transcendental Idealism: A Hypothesis?
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In this article I investigate Kant’s argumentation in the Critique of Pure Reason in favor of transcendental idealism. The argumentation for transcendental idealism seeks to establish the main conjecture of Kant’s Copernican hypothesis, to the effect that objects are conformed to our knowledge and not our knowledge to objects. But if the argumentation for transcendental idealism should presuppose anything of the Copernican hypothesis itself, then such argumentation remains as hypothetical as the Copernican hypothesis. What I seek to establish in this article is that in the Critique Kant presupposes the same presuppositions as does the Copernican turn, in which case transcendental idealism, as defended in the Critique, is nothing more than an elaborate hypothesis.
6. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Mark K. Spencer Abelard on Status and their Relation to Universals: A Husserlian Interpretation
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The discussion of universals in Peter Abelard’s Logica ‘Ingredientibus’ has been interpreted in many ways. Of particular controversy has been the proper way to interpret his use of the term status. In this paper I offer an interpretation of status by comparing Abelard’s account of knowledge of universals to Edmund Husserl’s presentations of categorial and eidetic intuition. I argue that status is meant to be understood as something like an ideal object, in Husserl’s sense of the term. First, I present Abelard’s discussion of status and distinguish this term from universals, things, acts of understanding, and forms. Next, I consider Husserl’s account of categorial and eidetic intuition. Finally, I draw parallels between the two while showing how an interpretation of status as ideal object overcomesthe interpretive problems encountered by other commentators on Abelard.
7. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Katherin Rogers Defending Boethius: Two Case Studies in Charitable Interpretation
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Among those who study medieval philosophy there is a divide between historians and philosophers. Sometimes the historians chide the philosophers for failing to appreciate the historical factors at work in understanding a text, a philosopher, a school, or a system. But sometimes the philosopher may justly criticize the historian for failing to engage the past philosopher adequately as a philosopher. Here I defend a philosophically charitable methodology and offer two examples, taken from John Marenbon’s book Boethius, as instances where exercising more philosophical charity would likely have resulted in more adequate or complete interpretations. The examples are taken from Marenbon’s analyses of the conclusion of Boethius’s discussion of freedom and divine foreknowledge and ofBoethius’s argument against Euthyche’s understanding of the Incarnation.
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8. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
John J. Davenport The Will: A Dual Aspect Theory
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9. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Susan Yoshihara Terrorism and the Ethics of War
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10. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
John D. Gilroy, Jr. 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James’s Revolutionary Philosophy
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