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1. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
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2. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Daniel Kolb, Robert Lehe The Nihilistic Consequences of the Argument from Evil
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The evidential argument for atheism from evil may be appealing because it seems both less naïve and more enlightened than theism. However, implicit in the argument that the world contains so much evil that it could not have been created by God is the tacitnihilistic proposition that the world is so bad that it would be better that it not exist at all. Besides entailing an unattractive rejection of the worth of the existence of the world, atheism motivated by the argument from evil is also embroiled in moral inconsistencies that make it difficult or impossible for the atheologian to live and act in the world with moral consistency and seriousness.
3. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Chris Fraser Skepticism and Value in the Zhuāngzi
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The ethics of the Zhuāngzi is distinctive for its valorization of psychological qualities such as open-mindedness, adaptability, and tolerance. The paper discusses how these qualities and their consequences for morality and politics relate to the text’s views onskepticism and value. Chad Hansen has argued that Zhuangist ethical views are motivated by skepticism about our ability to know a privileged scheme of action-guiding distinctions, which in turn is grounded in a form of relativism about such distinctions. Against this, Icontend that the Zhuāngzi’s skepticism and its ethical stance jointly rest on a metaethical view of value as inherently plural, perspectival, heterogeneous, and contingent. This view provides grounds for moral consideration toward others and for political liberalism. It also explains how the psychological qualities valorized in the Zhuāngzi contribute to the value of our individual lives, by showing what their absence costs us.
4. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Elizabeth Salas Abduction and the Origin of “Musement”: Peirce’s “Neglected Argument for the Reality of God”
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This paper is an evaluation of C. S. Peirce’s late essay “A Neglected Argument for the Reality of God” (1908), based on the two logical values that he calls “productiveness” and “security.” After reviewing the unique logical form of “abduction” and noting that it is a formal fallacy—and so enjoys less “security” than deduction or induction—I turn to the extraordinary case of abduction that is found in “A Neglected Argument.” I argue that the productiveness of the Neglected Argument is found in its ability to instigate practical results. The security of the Neglected Argument, on the other hand, is rooted in an activity Peirce calls “musement,” a kind of rational intuition. Moreover, I suggest that Peirce’s notion of “musement,” which has remained something of a mystery in Peirce studies, arose from hisearly reading of Friedrich von Schiller’s aesthetics.
5. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Peter Tumulty Recognizing Varieties of Objectivity in Promoting a Global Culture of Human Rights: Remarks in the Tradition of Plato, Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein
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Are there universal and objective rights? Is the discourse of “rights” a mask for Western interests? The way in which individuals assess these arguments affects the hope that globalization will have a moral dimension. One aim of this paper is to reinforce such a hope by drawing on a broad tradition that goes back to Plato and that is carried forward more recently by Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein. Two sources for relativism, postmodernism and scientism, are examined and found to depend on a narrow understanding of reason’s ability to grasp different kinds of truths. This essay also examines cosmopolitan views about the universality of rights that treat “universality” too abstractly. The kind of universality or objectivity preferred here recognizes that differences are as significant as similarities.
6. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Jeffrey Downard Natural Purposes and the Category of Community: Strengths and Weaknesses of Kant’s Account
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In the second part of the Critique of Judgment, Immanuel Kant provides a transcendental analysis of the bases of our right to employ teleological conceptions in biology. A living organism exemplifies the conception of a natural end insofar as the organization of the parts to form a whole is the result of a process in which the organism is both cause and effect of itself. Kant’s analysis of the concept of a natural purpose is guided, in part, by his general theory of logic. By examining the manner in which the logical modes of relation are used as a basis for analyzing the concept of a natural purpose, I hope to accomplish two goals: (1) to compare Kant’s analysis of the category of community to the analysis of the concept of a natural purpose; (2) to evaluate some of the strengths and weaknesses ofKant’s account of community and natural purpose; (3) to consider one criticism of Kant’s use of the logical form of the disjunctive as a basis for the analysis of these conceptions that is developed by Charles Sanders Peirce. Peirce indicates that Darwin’s theory of biological evolution was one of the primary causes that led him revisit Kant’s logic and his analysis of the categories of relation.
7. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Lee Ward The Relation between Politics and Philosophy in Plato’s Apology of Socrates
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In Plato’s Apology of Socrates, Socrates claims that any just person who becomes involved in politics will be destroyed by the “multitude” and that the philosopher must therefore lead a private life. I argue that Socrates’ elaboration of his relation to the political community, especially in the trial of the generals of Arginusae and the arrest of Leon, raises more questions than a cursory reading can answer both with respect to the logical structure of the argument in the Apology and in comparison with other Socratic formulationsof the relation of philosophy and the city. Far from demonstrating the incompatibility of philosophy and politics, Socrates in the Apology and other dialogues limns the features of a conception of political life that incorporates philosophical principles of moderation anddialectical examination into an understanding of politics directed towards the moral and intellectual development of the citizens.
book reviews and notices
8. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Christopher M. Rice A Shared Morality: A Narrative Defense of Natural Law Ethics
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9. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Joseph W. Koterski, S.J. The Nature of Love
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10. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Lloyd P. Gerson Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists
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11. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Claudine Tiercelin Peirce’s Theory of Signs
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12. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Merold Westphal Kierkegaard: An Introduction
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13. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
James Swindal God, Philosophy, Universities
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14. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Craig A. Condella The Early Heidegger & Medieval Philosophy
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15. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Joseph G. Trabbic Reading Jean-Luc Marion: Exceeding Metaphysics
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16. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Daniel Fincke Pious Nietzsche: Decadence and Dionysian Faith
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17. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Christopher Adams Book Notices
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18. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Books Received
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19. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 49 > Issue: 4
Annual Index
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