Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Browse by:



Displaying: 1-10 of 14 documents


articles
1. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 52 > Issue: 3
About Our Contributors
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
2. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 52 > Issue: 3
Anders Odenstedt Being a Child of One’s Time: Hegel on Thought and Cultural Context
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This paper discusses different senses of Hegel’s claim that the individual is “a child of his time.” Hegel argues that the individual’s mind (“subjective Spirit”) is profoundly influenced by its time, i.e., the cultural context that forms its temporal setting (“objective Spirit”). However, Hegel makes somewhat conflicting claims in this regard: (i) that individuals harbor the presuppositions of their cultural context unreflectively; (ii) that philosophy overcomes the form of this unreflectiveness, but that the content of philosophy remains tied to its time since it tries reflectively to justify current presuppositions; (iii) that this reflection occurs when a culture declines, and that reflection, too, therefore is a child of its time; (iv) that an individual may be a minority thinker (despite what claim [i] says), but that even such an individual is a child of his time in the (weaker) sense that he is unable to influence it precisely because he transcends it.
3. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 52 > Issue: 3
Kate Padgett Walsh Distance and Engagement: Hegel’s Account of Critical Reflection
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Hegel famously argues that Kant’s account of critical distance depends upon an impoverished conception of freedom. In its place, Hegel introduces a richer conception of freedom, according to which the self who is capable of self-determination is multifaceted: wanting and thinking, social and individual. This richer conception gives rise to an account of critical reflection that emphasizes engagement with our motives and practices rather than radical detachment from them. But what is most distinctive about Hegel’s account is the idea that when we reflect upon motives and practices, we draw upon shared self-understandings that are neither universal nor just particular to individuals. There is, Hegel argues, no presocial identity or self that can be detached from our socially constituted contexts of thought and value. This has important implications for how we conceive of critical reflection.
4. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 52 > Issue: 3
Philip J. Ivanhoe Understanding Traditional Chinese Philosophical Texts
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The descriptive aim of this essay is to sort out and distinguish among some different hermeneutical approaches to Chinese philosophical texts and to make clear that the approach that one employs carries with it important implications about the kind of intellectual project one is pursuing. The primary normative claim is that in order to be doing research in the field of traditional Chinese philosophy, one must make a case for one’s interpretation as representing philosophical views that have been held by Chinese thinkers and that making such a case is a distinctive type of intellectual activity analogous to making a case in a court of law. In addition to this conceptual or methodological point, I argue that the interpretation of Chinese philosophical texts should make clear and take into account the special role that commentary has played throughout the tradition.
5. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 52 > Issue: 3
John Kronen, Joy Laine Realism and Essentialism in the Nyāya Darśana
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Philosophers affiliated with the Nyāya school of classical Indian philosophy developed an impressive species of realism. Nyāya philosophers defended direct realism in holding that we perceive bodies, not just their qualities or mental images of their qualities. This sort of realism has been out of favor for centuries in the West and faces a number of problems that the Nyāya knew and answered in a sophisticated way. Rather than focus on the Nyāya defense of direct realism, we focus on the Nyāya defense of epistemological realism in order to explicate what Nyāya philosophers took to be implications of their view that we know something about the way things are in themselves. Specifically, we argue that the epistemological realism of the Nyāya philosophers commits them to a strong form of essentialism, which furthermore entails that substances exist and instantiate natural-kind universals.
6. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 52 > Issue: 3
Louis A. Mancha, Jr. Aquinas, Suarez, and Malebranche on Instrumental Causation and Premotion
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In the analysis of Aquinas, instrumental causation is central to his doctrine of providence, yet their connection is not widely understood. On the one hand, early modern thinkers like Nicolas Malebranche claim that any notion of instrumental causation is unintelligible as a mode of divine operation. Alternatively, certain Thomists commit Aquinas to the doctrine of premotion, which partially resolves the problem of instrumental causation, but only at the cost of eliminating the causal freedom of creatures. In this paper I address these two issues. After providing an outline of Aquinas’s position on instrumental causation, I first argue that Thomistic instrumentalism is not the target of Malebranche’s objections, for Malebranche endorses a view very much like that of Aquinas. Secondly, I discuss the doctrine of premotion and offer some reasons for thinking that Aquinas was not a premotionist.
7. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 52 > Issue: 3
Michael D. Garral The Possibility of Agnosticism: Russell’s Retreat from Atheism
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Russell espouses atheism; indeed he regards it as the default. However, he also lays claim to agnosticism, backing into it by way of the argument from ignorance. This essay asserts that in light of how he frames the relationship between atheism and agnosticism, the latter is not the available alternative that he and his assessors assume it is—not because its stance is indefensible (as others have argued), but because of what, given his point of origin (atheism and the fallibilism that frames it), he has to hold in order for it to be even a possibility. In a phrase, on Russell’s construal, agnosticism as an option is idle.
book reviews
8. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 52 > Issue: 3
Carlo DaVia Aristotle’s Moral Realism Reconsidered: Phenomenological Ethics, by Pavlos Kontos
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
9. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 52 > Issue: 3
Turner C. Nevitt Thomism and Tolerance, by John F. X. Knasas
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
10. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 52 > Issue: 3
Joseph K. Cosgrove Causation and Laws of Nature in Early Modern Philosophy, by Walter Ott
view |  rights & permissions | cited by