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1. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
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2. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Lorraine Yeung The Nature of Horror Reconsidered
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There is a growing interest in the role of non-cognitive affective responses in the philosophical literature on fiction and emotion. This flurry of scholarly interest is partly a reaction to cognitivist accounts of fiction and emotion that have been found to be inadequate. The inadequacy is particularly salient when this approach is employed to account for narrative horror. Cognitivist conceptions of the emotion engendered by narrative horror prove to be too restrictive. Cognitivist accounts also fail to give the formal devices and stylistic elements deployed in narrative horror a proper place within the spectator’s emotional engagement with it. In this paper I propose an alternative conception of the emotion “horror” that incorporates non-cognitive affective responses. I argue that this conception of “horror” is more fine-grained than the one characterized as a cognitivist approach. It captures more literary examples of the horror experience and it accommodates better the fear of the unknown. It also makes possible an aesthetics of horror in which formal devices and stylistic elements are given their proper place.
3. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Michael Barker The Argumentative Significance of Relative Purposiveness
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In the Critique of the Teleological Power of Judgment Kant argues that organisms have inner purposiveness. He introduces inner purposiveness in contrast to relative purposiveness. I examine Kant’s discussion of relative purposiveness in §63. I then argue that Kant establishes three theses in §63 that he subsequently modifies in §64 and further refines in §65. In my view, his discussion of relative purposiveness serves a broader purpose than just to present a contrast from which to consider inner purposiveness. The discussion of relative purposiveness establishes a framework for a sustained thread of argument from §63 through §65, culminating in Kant’s often discussed claim that we must judge organisms to be natural ends. My interpretation exposes a more significant argumentative role for relative purposiveness than is typically recognized.
4. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Joseph Gamache Aquinas and Contemporary Epistemology: The Case of the Truth-Norm
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Whether and how truth is a norm of belief is a contentious issue in contemporary epistemology. In this paper I retrieve Aquinas’s conception of truth in order to advance a new answer to the question of what grounds the truth-norm. I begin by contrasting the two dominant contemporary accounts of this grounding, showing ways in which each succeeds and fails. Unlike the currently dominant accounts, my account seeks to ground the truth-norm in the nature of truth, as opposed to the nature of belief. Ultimately I argue that Aquinas’s conception of truth furnishes us with an account of the grounding of the truth-norm that satisfies three conditions of adequacy. Such an account (1) grounds the truth-norm in the nature of truth, (2) captures the breadth of epistemic evaluation, and (3) makes sense of the fact that truth is a norm specifically for the human person.
5. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Gaven Kerr The Immediate Realism of Léon Noël
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After the emergence of the neo-Thomist movement in the early twentieth century, the question of how best to present Aquinas’s latent epistemological realism came to the fore. Léon Noël was an important contributor to this area of neo-Thomism, but his work has unfortunately been eclipsed by that of other more recognizable authors such as Etienne Gilson and Jacques Maritain. Noël argued that Aquinas’s realism is a form of immediate realism that recognizes the challenge of modern representationalist epistemologies but does not succumb to non-realist ways of thinking. Hence Noël presented immediate realism as an epistemological position that is inspired by Aquinas but also capable of addressing philosophical concerns that emerged after his death. In this article I present Noël’s view as interesting in its own right and capable of engaging with contemporary non-Thomist trends in epistemology.
6. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Silvia Carli The Most Complete Activity
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This paper provides an interpretation of Aristotle’s claim that activities (energeiai) such as seeing, which are complete (teleiai) in form, can nevertheless be more or less complete depending on the condition of the faculty and the character of the object on which the faculty acts (Nicomachean Ethics 10.4.1174b14–20). After reviewing and criticizing current interpretations, it argues that activities that are complete in form are more or less complete in that they can attain their end to a lesser or greater degree. The notion of degrees of completeness is then used to show that Aristotle’s seemingly conflicting claims on the possibility of acting virtuously in the Nicomachean Ethics are elements of a unified picture in which actions display different degrees of virtue or excellence.
7. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Edward Ryan Moad Divine Conservation, Concurrence, and Occasionalism
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Occasionalism is the doctrine that relegates all real causal efficacy exclusively to God. This paper will aim to elucidate in some detail the metaphysical considerations that, together with certain common medieval theological axioms, constitute the philosophical steps leading to this doctrine. First, I will explain how the doctrine of divine conservation implies that we should attribute to divine power causal immediacy in every natural event and that it rules out mere conservationism as a model of the causal relation between God and nature. This leaves concurrentism and occasionalism as the only compatible options. Then I will explain the argument that since no coherent conception of divine concurrence is possible, occasionalism emerges as the only model of the causal relation between God and nature compatible with the doctrine of divine conservation.
book reviews
8. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Brian Gregor In Praise of Heteronomy: Making Room for Revelation. By Merold Westphal
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9. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Christopher H. Owen John Senior and the Restoration of Realism. By Francis Bethel, O.S.B.
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10. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Brendan Sweetman Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Contra Gentiles: A Guide and Commentary. By Brian Davies
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