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1. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 24 > Issue: 4
Julia M. Matuga Introduction to the Special Issue on Vytgotskian Perspectives of Critical and Creative Thinking
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2. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 24 > Issue: 4
Bert van Oers The Potentials of Imagination
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Starting from a Vygotskian analysis of imagination as “image formation,” this paper explores some emergent qualities of the phenomenon of imagination in the play activities of young children. In the context of the early grades of Dutch primary schools (4-7-year old children) different activities of children were studied while they were making symbolic representations of real or imaginary situations. Observations in two activity settings show that the children got engaged in two types of imagination: an ‘etc-act of imagination’ and a ‘production of alternatives.’ It wIll be argued that these types of imagination are basic modes of thinking that relate to respectively abstract thinking and to creative thinking.
3. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 24 > Issue: 4
Fran Hagstrom Creating Creative Identity
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The construction of creative identity from a Vygotskian perspective is explored in this paper. A theoretical link is made between Vygotsky’s (Smolucha, 1992) claims about the development of creativity and Penuet and Wertsch’s (1995) use of Vygotskian theory to address identity formation. Narrative is suggested as the link between culturally organized activities, mediated mental functioning, and the storied self. Data from semi-structured interviews about creativity conducted with a second grade child and his parents illustrate how discourses from home and school come together during the development of imagination and are used to construct identity.
4. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 24 > Issue: 4
Julia M. Matuga, Heidi L. Styrk Children’s Speech-Drawing: External Manifestations of Critical and Creative Thinking
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Vygotsky (1997) coined the term speech-drawing to describe what he saw as the most significant moment in intellectual development, the moment when two psychological tools intersect each other. This paper resurrects the utilization of speech-drawing as a methodological tool to investigate children’s thinking. Specifically, this paper will examine children’s drawings of make-believe houses and the private speech, or spontaneous self-directed speech, children produccd while drawing. These instances of speech-drawing will be utilized to illuminate critical and creative thinking from a Vygotskian perspective. The future use of speech-drawing, as a promising methodological tool to study children’s thought processes, will also be presented and discussed.
5. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 24 > Issue: 4
Suzanne Miller The Dialogue of Creative and Critical Thinking: Vygotskian Perspectives on Mediated Leaning on a Literature-History Class
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In this paper I argue that creative and critical thinking operate in tandem in the mind as a purposeful dialectic of generative and evaluative dimensions of sense-making. The complementariness of these two forms of thought are dramatized through a case study in an innovative literature-history class, by tracing thc development of critical and creative thinking in one students process of authoring. In the class the teachers mediated students’ thinking by engaging them in open-forum conversation about varied cultural-historical perspectives and then providing strategies for both generating interpretations and questioning/critiquing them. As multiple conflicting perspectives from literature and history interplayed in the class, the student was prompted to construct a point of view by considering opposing lines of thought in a dialogue of creative and critical thinking. He appropriated these new tools, internalizing strategies for and a disposition toward creative and critical thinking to make sense of complex texts and social issues. Vygotsky’s notions of problem-solving, play, mediation, ZPD, and internalization are used to explain how student thinking developed in this context.
articles
6. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Kenneth T. Henson Introduction
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7. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Linda K. Elksnin Using Cases to Improve the Critical Thinking Skills of Prospective Teachers
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This essential that prospective teachers develop critical thinking skills. However, they cannot develop these skills simply by reading the assigned text, taking notes during lecture, and completing exams. The case method of instruction (CMI) relies on real-life situations to teach students general problem solving and decision making through active participation in the leaming process. Thus, CMI offers an effective means of developing the critical thinking skills of prospective teachers. This article presents guidelines teacher educators can follow to create case-based classrooms. Specific recommendations are offered regarding case selection, case presentation, case writing, and case evaluation procedures.
8. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Dan T. Ouzts, Mark J. Palombo Case Method in a Graduate Children’s Literature Course to Foster Critical Thinking: Picture Books and the QAR
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This research describes and presents a reading comprehension strategy called the Question-Answer Relationship (QAR) that was used in a graduate level children’s literature course that combined the characteristics of the case study method and critical thinking connected to picture books. The intent of the research was to provide a framework to graduate students for teaching both reading comprehension and critical thinking, The use of questioning served as the structure or strategy for the graduate students to subsequently apply this to their classrooms. Problems, questions, and issues in one picture book (Faithful Elephants, 1951) served as sources of motivationand critical thinking for the case study method.
9. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Minnie N. Blackwell, WendeIl J. Rodgers, Stephenie M. Hewett The Use of Case Studies to Instruct Qualities of Leadership in a Character Education Program
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The case study method offers a hands-on inquiry based method for teaching leadership traits. With this in mind, the case study method is used to provide opportunities for middle school students to analyze a situation and the actions of the case study charactcrs and to identify leadership behaviors. The use of the case study method allows instructors to teach character education to this group of middle school students by promoting the use of critical thinking skills through small group discussions and reflections. The staff is confident by using this method that the students are able to analyze, discuss, and draw conclusions for discussions in small groups.
10. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Richard K. Murray, Kay D. Woelfel, Gerald M. Bullock Making the ‘Case’ for Performance Appraisal
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Accreditation requirements for schools of education across the country have changed dramatically in recent years. Accreditation bodies are no longer willing to accept a proclamation that a particular standard or guideline is being addressed in a course through lecture or course requirements. Performance assessment is the current concept requiring schools of education to demonstrate student mastery of a standard and to provide data demonstrating this mastery. Case studies present a teaching and learning opportunity to demonstrate students have the ability to master a particular accreditation standard or guideline while also providing a method to ensure an opportunity to develop higher order thinking skills.