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Displaying: 1-10 of 22 documents


articles
1. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Awad Ibrahim Thinking Critically, Choosing Politically: Anti-racism and/or Multiculturalism Education (?)
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2. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Don Fawkes Reliance on Indicator Terms is not Critical Thinking
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3. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
William Irwin, Gregory Bassham Depression, Informal Fallacies, and Cognitive Therapy: The Critical Thinking Cure?
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4. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Christopher A. Pynes A Modern Analytic Socrates and Meno’s Paradox: A Dialogue
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5. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
John Follman, Danny O’Neal Critical Thinking 21st Century Computer Literature Search Databases in Nursing: Caveat Emptor
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reprint
6. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Don Fawkes, Tom Adajian, Dan Flage Examining the Exam: A Critical Look at the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal Exam
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This paper examines the content of the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal exam. (1980) Our report is not a statistical review. We find the content of this exam defective in a number of areas. The exam consists of five “tests” of 16 questions for a total of 80 questions. Of these, we cannot recommend test 1, test 2, test 4, and test 5; and, we cannot recommend questions 4, 5, 14, 16,37, 45, 60, 63, 64, 65, 66, and 67. As shown in this report, the exam creates confusion and makes basic errors in critical thinking in a number of areas, and therefore, lacks content quality in these areas, Hence, no statistical results pertaining to the administration of these areas to students can be informative. We find the remaining areas acceptable as to content. But until the problems are corrected, we can only recommend that those who may use the exam remove the defective parts from test administration or from data collection and reporting. We recommend the former, because of the wasted time involved in the latter. This would amount to administering only 14 questions, i.e. test 3 with questions 37 and 45 eliminated.We also find the scope of the exam to be quite limited, but allow that this may be unavoidable for any instrument designed to be completed in about an hour. We further recommend the use of several tests, rather than one; and, that any such results be understood only as a measure of minimal competency (below which remediation likely is needed) for the skills tested, but not as an adequate measure of critical thinking.
book review
7. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 3
Megan Laverty Philosophy
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articles
8. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 4
Christopher H. Skinner Inquiry and Critical Thinking in School-Based Problem Solving: Behavioral Psychology in the Schools
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9. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 4
Renee Oliver, Christopher H. Skinner Using Data-Based Decision Making to Develop and Evaluate an Intervention to Decrease Inappropriate Vocalizations and Increase Assignment Completion
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The current behavioral consultation case demonstrates how functional behavioral assessment (FBA) data, basic and applied research, teacher preferences, and contextual variables contribute to the decision making process when developing classroom intervention procedures. A male, African-American, fifth-grade general education student was initially referred for his inappropriate vocalizations duringtime designated for independent seatwork. FBA data suggested that this behavior was being reinforced with teacher attention. Additional data showed that he was failing to complete his assignments. An intervention was implemented where the student was given assignments one a time. He was instructed to solicit teacher attention and his next assignment after completing each assignment. Analysis ofteacher ratings for inappropriate vocalizations and assignment performance data suggest that the intervention was effective in increasing assignment completion and decreasing inappropriate verbalizations. Discussion focuses on how the various data playa role in the development and implementation of classroom intervention procedures.
10. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 21 > Issue: 4
Gregg A. Johns How Behaviorists Treat Behavior Problems: Critical Thinking about Functional Analysis
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This article presents a description of the procedures used by behavioral psychologists to intervene with behavioral excesses and deficits in educational and clinical settings. Its focus is to provide a fundamental overview of these services for the educator and direct care staff. The discussion covers the topics of functional analysis, behavioral assessment, the Stimulus-Organismic-Response-Consequence model (SORC), positive and negative reinforcement, and treatment acceptability. The importance of the educator and direct care staff member’s participation in the development of implementation of behavioral interventions is emphasized.