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1. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Daniel Fasko, Jr. From the Editor’s Desk
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2. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Frank Fair A Word to INQUIRY Readers
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3. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Yoram Harpaz Conflicting Logics in Teaching Critical Thinking
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The article aims at (1) organizing the theoretical ideas of critical thinking on the basis of an overall and systematic conception of education, (2) exposing tensions and contradictions in the various conceptions of critical thinking and (3) suggesting a directing principle for the teaching of critical thinking. In order to achieve these far-reaching aims, the author projects “The Cognitive Map of Instruction” developed by Zvi Lamm on the discourse of critical thinking. Through this “map” it seems that all sub-trends of teaching critical thinking may be divided into three defined “logics,” and that these sub-trends harbor two kinds of internal contradictions: between the different “logics” of teaching, and between their pattern of teaching and the idea of critical thinking. Since none of the three “logics” suggested by Lamm (1976) in “The Cognitive Map of Instruction” suits the purpose of teaching critical thinking, the article turns away from this “map,” that served it so well to locate and expose the various trends of critical thinking. This turn is made on behalf of another idea of Lamm—that of undermining pedagogy. This well-rooted idea may direct the pedagogy of critical thinking toward a coherent and effective instruction.
4. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Ana M. Nieto, Carlos Saiz Critical Thinking: A Question of Aptitude and Attitude?
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Traditionally, it has been held that critical thinking requires a set of cognitive skills and dispositions. The present work supports the opinion of some theorists who have proposed that these might not be the only two ingredients necessary for improving critical thinking. More specifically, new factors could be necessary if critical thinking is to be achieved, such as gaining an epistemological understanding of critical thinking; reaching a given level of epistemological development, or the beliefs that are held about thinking. These new components are analysed conceptually and instructionally. Special attention is also devoted to dispositions.
5. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Harikumar Sankaran, Mariza Dimitrijevic Implications for Critical Thinking Dispositions: Evidence from Freshmen in New Mexico
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6. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Frank Fair, John Miller, Valerie Muehsam, Wendy (McCoy) Elliott TACTS™: Developing a New Critical Thinking Assessment Instrument
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When the accrediting association for collegiate schools of business, AACSB International, reformulated its accreditation standards to include a systematic assessment of undergraduates’ progress in analytic and reflective thinking, our interdisciplinary team looked at available instruments. Logistical problems, concerns about validity, and an interest in assessing quantitative skills not covered in the available instruments led us to devise the Texas Assessment of Critical Thinking Skills™ (TACTS™). As part of the process we followed a suggestion from Scriven and Fisher and incorporated novel multiple-rating items. We went through a lengthy process of test validation, employing both expert consultants and a large-scale comparison between performances on a standard critical thinking skills test and the TACTS™. Consequently, our university is in a position to regularly assess the progress made by undergraduates from our College of Business in acquiring the relevant analytic and reflective thinking skills.