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1. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 3
Frank Fair From the Editor’s Desk
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2. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 3
Gerald Nosich From Argument and Philosophy to Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum
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This reflective article details the evolution of Gerald Nosich’s view of what critical thinking involves. Nosich recounts three major stages in the development of his views: (1) starting a course on Reasoning that strongly engaged students in the actual practices of argument analysis and evaluation, (2) then teaching a course Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum which called into graphic prominence other aspects of critical thinking beyond arguments, for example, observing thoughtfully and reflectively, raising key questions with respect to an issue, and discerning a common structure underlying different phenomena, and, finally, (3) realizing the power of Richard Paul’s emphasis on common elements and standards involved in critical thinking.
3. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 3
Steven Trickey How Can Students be Encouraged to Think Critically? Infusing Inquiry Across Subject Disciplines
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This paper discusses the use of collaborative inquiry approaches to promote critical thinking and ‘deep’ learning across different subject domains and at different educational stages. The content of this paper follows on from a four-year evaluation of the Thinking through Philosophy project that took place in a number of schools in Scotland. Although the original research focused on developing thinking in young students (aged 10 to 12 years), the project subsequently widened the targeted age range both down to younger pre-school students (aged 4 years) and upward to pre-Higher Education students (aged 16 years). The author argues that interactive thinking and learning processes, as exemplified by ‘collaborative inquiry,’ appear equally relevant to students of different ages andstages including those studying higher education courses. The paper starts with an overview of the Clackmannanshire research before considering the application of inquiry-based approaches across a wide range of subject disciplines and educational stages, including higher education.
4. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 3
Robert L. Williams, Kathleen B. Aspiranti, Katherine R. Krohn Critical Thinking and Sociopolitical Values Reflective of Political Ideology
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Critical thinking measures have often been empirically associated with other cognitive dimensions (e.g., achievement test scores, IQ scores, exam scores) but seldom with sociopolitical perspectives. Consequently, the current study examined the relationship of critical thinking to sociopolitical values reflective of political ideology, namely respect for civil liberties, emphasis on national security, militarism, and support for the Iraq War. In a sample of 232 undergraduates attending a Southeastern university, critical thinking correlated significantly with respect for civil liberties (.19), emphasis on national security (-.29), militarism (-.25), and support for the Iraq War (-.28). A logistic regression analysis showed that the sociopolitical measures significantly predicted placement in high and low critical thinking groups, with support for the Iraq War being the primary predictor. A multivariate analysis (MANOVA) revealed that the sociopolitical means for the high and low critical thinking groups all differed significantly. The results suggest that critical thinking scores are generally predictive of liberal versus conservative political ideology.
5. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 3
Kevin Possin The Power of Critical Thinking
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6. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 3
Monica Pignotti Social Work Practice: A Critical Thinker’s Guide
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7. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 3
Monica Pignotti Critical Thinking for Helping Professionals: A Skills Based Workbook
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8. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Daniel Fasko, Jr. From the Editor’s Desk
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9. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Frank Fair A Word to INQUIRY Readers
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10. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Yoram Harpaz Conflicting Logics in Teaching Critical Thinking
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The article aims at (1) organizing the theoretical ideas of critical thinking on the basis of an overall and systematic conception of education, (2) exposing tensions and contradictions in the various conceptions of critical thinking and (3) suggesting a directing principle for the teaching of critical thinking. In order to achieve these far-reaching aims, the author projects “The Cognitive Map of Instruction” developed by Zvi Lamm on the discourse of critical thinking. Through this “map” it seems that all sub-trends of teaching critical thinking may be divided into three defined “logics,” and that these sub-trends harbor two kinds of internal contradictions: between the different “logics” of teaching, and between their pattern of teaching and the idea of critical thinking. Since none of the three “logics” suggested by Lamm (1976) in “The Cognitive Map of Instruction” suits the purpose of teaching critical thinking, the article turns away from this “map,” that served it so well to locate and expose the various trends of critical thinking. This turn is made on behalf of another idea of Lamm—that of undermining pedagogy. This well-rooted idea may direct the pedagogy of critical thinking toward a coherent and effective instruction.