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1. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Frank Fair From the Editor’s Desk
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2. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Robert Ennis Critical Thinking: Reflection and Perspective Part I
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This is Part I of a two-part reflection by Robert Ennis on his involvement in the critical thinking movement. Part I deals with how he got started in the movement and with the development of his influential definition of critical thinking and his conception of what critical thinking involves. Part II of the reflection will appear in the next issue of INQUIRY, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Summer 2011), and it will cover topics concerned with assessing critical thinking, teaching critical thinking, and what the future may hold.
3. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Michael Gillespie Assessing Critical Thinking about Values: A Quasi-Experimental Study
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Critical thinking and values are fundamental topics of interest in higher education. The current study is an empirical validation of a university’s effort to teach students to apply critical thinking to the recognition and articulation of values contained in focal essays. A Critical Thinking about Values Assessment (CTVA) is provided, which evaluates students’ responses regarding (1) key components of critical thinking, and (2) “critical thinking about values,” in response to the essays. These two criteria were assessed at the beginning and end of the semester as part of a naturally-occurring quasiexperiment. Results provide some support for the reliability and validity of the CTVA and suggest that the program has a tenuous relationship with students’ critical thinking, but a moderate to strongrelationship with students’ ability to recognize and articulate values.
4. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Maria Sanders Embracing Critical Thinking as a Model for Professional Development: Creating Critical Thinking Based – Faculty Learning Communities On Your Campus
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This essay provides a summary of the steps taken to build a critical thinking based faculty learning community (CTB-FLC) on the Lone Star College – CyFair campus across various disciplines. The author shares the motivations driving this project, the challenges and successes of the ten participating members, and the plans for future CTB-FLCs. The primary purpose of this essay is to encourage other colleges to build similar critical thinking based faculty learning communities as professional development opportunities on their campuses. The essay culminates with a set of recommendations which result from the lessons learned during the implementation of a CTB-FLC from 2008 to 2010 at Lone Star College – CyFair.
5. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Maria Sanders, Jason Moulenbelt Defining Critical Thinking: How Far Have We Come?
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While there is no shortage of scholarship on the topic, there appears to be no widely accepted definition of critical thinking. This is coupled with the troublesome fact that those in higher education often believe their definitions are the norm. In this article, we demonstrate a lack of uniformity through a representative sample of historically influential definitions for critical thinking. These definitions are then classified into two distinct categories: context specific and cross-disciplinary definitions. From this lack of uniformity we argue that at least two problems in higher education arise: lack of proper critical thinking assessment and difficulty in interdisciplinary collaboration on the topic of critical thinking. Given the current focus on critical thinking assessment alongside a movement toward greater interdisciplinary collaboration within higher education, we conclude with a call for a uniform definition of critical thinking.
6. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Frank Codispoti The Academic College Course is An Argument
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A college academic course is an argument constructed by the professor who teaches the course. Richard Paul’s elements of thinking are used to clarify this contention. It is the responsibility of the professor to choose reading materials, construct lectures, and develop other activities and assignments that can best aid her students to understand the argument. Reading texts and listening to lectures effectively to grasp the argument requires critical thinking skills that can be learned by students. Students fail when those responsible for their education either assume they already possess such skills or that they cannot learn them.
7. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Idolina Hernandez Critical Thinking and Social Interaction in the Online Environment
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Critical thinking is often assumed to be an integral part of learning in higher education. This learning increasingly takes place in the online environment, where students and faculty are challenged to engage in a collaborative project of critical thinking. This paper seeks to explore the process of critical thinking that is currently taking place online and proposes that social interaction and the social construction of knowledge are integral parts of this process. Discussion boards from economics, history, and sociology are discussed as examples of how critical thinking is developed in the online environment.
8. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Heather M. Mong, Benjamin A. Clegg Tools of Critical Thinking: Metathoughts for Psychology
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9. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Jamie Whyte From Crimes Against Logic
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10. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Electronic Subscription Process
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