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1. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Frank Fair From the Editor’s Desk
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2. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Robert H. Ennis Ideal critical thinkers are disposed to
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3. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Robert Ennis Critical Thinking: Reflection and Perspective Part II
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This is the second part of a two-part reflection by Robert Ennis on his involvement in, and the progress of, the critical thinking movement. It provides a summary of Part I (Ennis 2011), including his definition/conception of critical thinking, the definition being “reasonable reflective thinking focused on deciding what to believe or do.” It then examines the assessment and the teaching of critical thinking (including incorporation in a curriculum), and makes suggestions regarding the future of critical thinking. He urges that now is the time to make a major effort in promoting critical thinking. Later may be too late. He also suggests a number of things to do. An Appendix, which provides a detailed elaboration of the nature of critical thinking, is at the end of Part I, but summaries are provided here.
4. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Keith Stanovich What Intelligence Test Miss: The Psychology of Rational Thought
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5. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Gordon D. Lamb, Cecil R. Reynolds Rationale for Considering Typical Critical Thinking Skills
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This paper’s purpose is to provide a foundation for viewing critical thinking as both a maximal and typical performance construct. While maximal performance measures the best a person can do, typical performance measures what the person is most likely to do. An overview of maximal performance, including its history and limitations, will be given. The role of maximal and typical performance in cognitive development will be demonstrated through an exploration of the relationships between behavior, the environment, personality, crystallized intelligence, and fluid intelligence. Furthermore, these topics will be related to the development and use of critical thinking skills. Discussion will conclude with directions for future research.
6. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Frank Codispoti The Academic College Course is An Argument
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7. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Ann van Heerden Transforming a Content-driven Chemistry Course to One Focused on Critical Thinking Skills Without Sacrificing Any Content
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This article chronicles the process used to transform a content-driven chemistry lab course into a course focused on developing critical-thinking skills. In general, the process described includes the following: 1) determining the needs of the students, 2) understanding the history of the course, 3) identifying some specific critical thinking skills that could be developed in the course, 4) considering how the skills can be taught developmentally, 5) defining criteria for the skills at different levels; 6) revising the lab manual to include explicit critical-thinking definitions, directions and criteria for students, and 7) designing assessments of the students’ critical thinking abilities as defined and practiced in the lab. Six critical thinking skills (testing hypotheses, distinguishing between observationsand inferences, identifying assumptions, drawing conclusions supported by data, evaluating conclusions, and considering alternative explanations of data) were incorporated into the course. The lab manual displaying the results of this transformation is available by request from either the author or the journal editor.
8. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Lori Richter Questions about Critical Thinking: A Survey of Relevant Research
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The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of studies that sought to answer a number of questions about critical thinking First, studies are reviewed that looked at the correlation of scores on two major instruments, the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal (WGCTA) and the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST). Then, results are reported that provide information about the relation between critical thinking and academic skills, and the independence of the construct of critical thinking. Finally, findings are reported on the relation between critical thinking and critical thinking dispositions, job related skills, years of education, fields of study, classroom interactions, learning styles, and cultural factors.
9. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Claire Phillips, Susan Green Faculty as Critical Thinkers: Challenging Assumptions
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The research presented in this paper used a case study approach to concentrate on the critical thinking preparation and skill sets of professors who, in turn, were expected to develop those same skills in their students. The authors interviewed community college instructors from both academic and work force disciplines. In general, the results of the study supported the researchers’ hypothesis that the ability to teach critical thinking was not necessarily intrinsic to a teaching professional. The authors of this study would like to suggest the following as a means of strengthening critical thinking expertise in faculty:1. Analyze current levels of critical thinking skills among faculty.2. Plan opportunities to bolster personal critical thinking knowledge within faculty ranks and develop a common critical thinking language among faculty.3. Assist faculty where necessary to develop new instructional models to strengthen critical thinking within their classrooms and critical thinking assessment instruments.
10. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Danielle M. Sitzman, Matthew G. Rhodes 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Behaviors
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