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1. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Frank Fair From the Editor’s Desk
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2. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Richard Paul Reflections on the Nature of Critical Thinking, Its History, Politics, and Barriers and on Its Status across the College/UniversityCurriculum Part II
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This is Part II of a reflection by Richard Paul on critical thinking, its theory and pedagogy, and on political and personal barriers to critical thinking education and practice. Part I of Paul’s reflection appeared in INQUIRY, Vol. 26 No. 3 (Fall 2011), pp. 5-24. In Part II Paul focuses on the concept of critical thinking, pointing out its unifying features as well as the many ways it can be contextualized in human thought and life. He lays out his basic critical thinking theory and offers critical thinking polarities for use in assessing critical thinking approaches. He provides an overview of the work of the Foundation for Critical Thinking in advancing fairminded critical thought in education and in society.
3. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Ana Mª Nieto, Jorge Valenzuela A Study of the Internal Structure of Critical Thinking Dispositions
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The execution of critical thinking depends on a set of skills and dispositions. It is unanimously accepted that skills represent the cognitive component, but consensus varies with regard to dispositions. Although most theoreticians admit that this is a complex construct integrated by motivations and mental habits, they don’t explain further. We have performed a study attempting to explore the internal structure of dispositions. We suggest a possible hypothesis of “Motivational Genesis of Dispositions,” according to which disposition would be formed by motivation and by mental habits, although the contribution of each of these factors would change depending on the practice gained in critical thinking. Thus, when a person is not practised in critical thinking, motivation makes a greatercontribution than mental habits. Nevertheless, with practice and motivated exercise of the skills of critical thinking, the influence of these mental habits increases. The regression analyses carried out support such a hypothesis.
4. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Collin Anderson, Scott Aiken, John Casey You Would Sing Another Tune: Subjunctive Tu Quoque Arguments
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A special version of arguments from hypocrisy, those known as tu quoque arguments, is introduced and developed. These are arguments from what one’s opponent would do, were conditions different, so they are what we call subjunctive tu quoque arguments. Arguments of this form are regularly taken to be fallacious, but the authors discuss conditions for determining when hypothetical inconsistency is genuinely relevant to criticizing a speaker’s assertion or proposed action and when it is not relevant.
5. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Linda Carroza Review of Reason in the Balance: An Inquiry Approach to Critical Thinking by Sharon Bailin and Mark Battersby
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6. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Thomas Fischer, Ph.D. Review of Critical Thinking: Consider the Verdict (6th edition) by Bruce N. Waller
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