Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Browse by:



Displaying: 1-7 of 7 documents


1. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Frank Fair From the Editor’s Desk
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
2. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Dr. Ralph H. Johnson When Informal Logic Met Critical Thinking
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In this reflection piece, Ralph Johnson provides an account of the development of informal logic and how it intersected with the Critical Thinking Movement. Section I is an account of the origins of what Johnson calls the “Informal Logic Initiative.” Section II discusses how the Informal Logic Initiative connected with the Critical Thinking Movement at the Sonoma State University Conferences starting in 1981. Section III discusses the relationship between logic and critical thinking. Section IV describes “The Network Problem,” which emerged for Johnson in the mid-1980s – largely as a result of his experiences at critical thinking conferences, especially the Sonoma State conference. Section V expresses some concerns about the current status of critical thinking as an educational idea and about the Critical Thinking Movement.
3. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Erratum
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
4. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Martin Davies Computer-Aided Argument Mapping and the Teaching of Critical Thinking: Part II
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Part I of this paper outlined the three standard approaches to the teaching of critical thinking: the normative (or philosophical), cognitive psychology, and educational taxonomy approaches. The paper contrasted these with the visualisation approach; in particular, computer-aided argument mapping (CAAM), and presented a detailed account of the CAAM methodology and a theoretical justification for its use. This part develops further support for CAAM. A case is made that CAAM improves critical thinking because it minimises the cognitive burden of prose and the demands that arguments in prose typically place on memory. CAAM also has greater usability, complements the imperfect human cognitive system, and adopts a logic of semi-formality which is both natural and intuitive. The paper claims that CAAM is an important advance given that traditional stand-alone critical thinking courses do not teach critical thinking as well as they as they are assumed to do. It is also important given that tertiary education fails to deliver improvements in critical thinking gains for too many students. The paper outlines results from a number of empirical studies that demonstrate that CAAM yields robust gains in critical thinking as measured by independent tests. Students themselves also believe CAAM to be beneficial as noted in coded responses to surveys. I conclude the paper by comparing the traditional approaches to the teaching of critical thinking to the visualisation approach. I argue that CAAM should taken seriously in the context of contemporary educational practices.
5. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Kevin Possin The Myth of Conductive Arguments
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The topic of conductive arguments, as a separate category of reasoning, is experiencing a revival. In 2010, the University of Windsor’s Centre for Research in Reasoning, Argumentation, and Rhetoric dedicated a two-day symposium to the topic and recently published the proceedings. In this article, I argue against the existence of conductive arguments as a distinct type and argue against a popular analysis of the structure of conductive arguments.
6. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Paul A. Wagner From Critical Thinking to Non-conclusive Argument and Back Again: A Review of Conductive Argument: An Overlooked Type of Defeasible Reasoning, Edited by J. Anthony Blair and Ralph H. Johnson
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
7. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Alhasan Allamnakhrah Critical Thinking Implementation by Lecturers at Two Secondary Pre-service Teacher Education Programs in Saudi Arabia
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Although there are differences among critical thinking (hereafter CT) theorists about aspects of critical thinking, there is consensus about its importance in education. Several Saudi scholars argue that there is a lack of CT among Saudi students at high school which is attributed to the lack of teacher knowledge and practice of CT. This qualitative case study based on Paul’s theoretical framework (1992) investigates the implementation of CT at two secondary preservice teacher education programs in Saudi Arabia. The results reveal that none of the lecturers taught CT, either explicitly or implicitly. While they all acknowledged the importance of CT, most maintained that they have never been instructed, advised or encouraged to teach CT. This study aims to build on the CT literature and address the gap in this literature in the Saudi context.