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1. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 1
Frank Fair From the Editor’s Desk
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2. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 1
Peter Facione, Noreen Facione Critical Thinking for Life: Valuing, Measuring, and Training Critical Thinking in All Its Forms
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This essay describes the questions which shaped and continue to fuel Peter and Noreen Facione’s passionate involvement with critical thinking, its definition, measurement, training, and practical application to everyday decisions, big and small. In reflecting on their work they say “we have identified three groups of questions: those vexing, recurring questions that motivate us to explore critical thinking, those scholarly questions around which we organized our empirical and conceptual research, and those urgent practical questions which demand the development of applications and assessment solutions. We conclude with two recommendations for the consideration of all those who value fair-minded, well-reasoned, reflective decision making.”
3. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 1
Amanda Hiner Critical Thinking in the Literature Classroom, Part I: Making Critical Thinking Visible
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Literary analysis offers English instructors an ideal vehicle for modeling, practicing, and teaching critical thinking skills. Because literature students must master the skills of analysis, reasoning, evaluation, and argumentation, they would benefit from deliberate and explicit instruction in the concepts and practices of critical thinking in the classroom. Part I of this paper describes strategies to incorporate explicit instruction in the elements of reasoning and the standards of critical thinking described by critical thinking experts Richard Paul, Linda Elder, and Gerald Nosich into the literature classroom. In the companion piece, “Critical Thinking in the Literature Classroom, Part II: Dickens’s Great Expectations and the Emergent Critical Thinker,” (Hiner 2013) a demonstration is given of how protagonists in literary works such as Pip from Dickens’s Great Expectations (1860-61/1996) can be understood and interpreted as literary representations of an individual’s transition from a first-order, unreflective thinker to a second-order, reflective, metacognitive critical thinker, further illuminating the literary texts and further reinforcing students’ understanding of the concepts of critical thinking.
4. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 1
Lawrence Y. Kohn Engaging Students to Use Their Minds Well: Exploring the Relationship Between Critical Thinking and Formative Assessment
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This paper explores the relationship between critical thinking and formative assessment. In this paper Popham’s (2008) conception of formative assessment as “a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students’ status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics” is highlighted as well as a framework from Stiggins and associates (2006). Despite vast research that indicates bothpositively impact student achievement, they are “errors of omission” and vastly underutilized in teacher preparation (Popham, 2008; Paul, Elder & Bartell, 1987). The national high school graduation rate (71.9%) and lack of college readiness of those who do graduate compel teacher education programs to prepare pre-service teachers who master these constructs (EPE Research Center, 2011; Conley, 2007). Formative assessment strategies are offered for classroom use and recommendations are made for university faculty who can model these strategies to improve teacher candidate quality.
5. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 1
Benjamin Hamby A Review of THINK Critically by Peter Facione and Carol Ann Gittens
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