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Displaying: 1-12 of 12 documents


symposium on afghanistan war
1. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Daniel A. Dombrowski Just War Theory, Afghanistan, and Walzer
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In this short article I call into question the view that the current United States war in Afghanistan is a war of necessity. In this effort I am primarily engaged with the thought of the famous just war theorist Michael Walzer as it has developed from 1977 until 2009.
2. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
John W. Lango Is There a Just Cause for Current U.S. Military Operations in Afghanistan?
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The current armed conflict in Afghanistan (briefly, the Afghan conflict) is viewed through the lens of a just war theory. In particular, the question stated by the title is explored by means of a generalized just cause principle. For brevity, empirical, practical, and legal issues about the Afghan conflict are mostly set aside. Hence a definite answer to the question is not proposed. Instead, the main aim is to clarify the question. Specifically, the question is amplified, by distinguishing putative just causes of countering terrorism, countering an insurgency, and countering extreme violations of basic human rights. Apparently, however, U.S. government officials (e.g., President Barack Obama) and U.S. military commanders (e.g., General Stanley McChrystal) have mixed goals or motives concerning current U.S.military operations in Afghanistan. Nonetheless, from the standpoint of a just war theory, it is instructive to analytically distinguish these putative just causes, and to consider them separately. Additionally, it is instructive to consider how they might be combined. Consequently, a fourth putative just cause is considered: countering violent spoilers of peacebuilding. (This paper was completed on March 31, 2010.)
3. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
George R. Lucas, Jr. Ethics and the ‘Human Terrain’: The Role of Academics in the Afghan War
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Against the backdrop of the current “ethics controversy” within the American Anthropological Association over the U.S. Army’s “Human Terrain Systems” project, this article evaluates the moral obligations of scholars and academics asked by their governments to contribute their unique expertise toward the waging or ending of wars of which those scholars morally disapprove. Citing the examples of moral dilemmas occasioned by conflicts between duties of scholarship and duties of citizenship from past wars, together with examples like “Doctors without Borders” at present, I argue that it is not automatically, or in principle, morally objectionable for scholars and academics to provide assistance to their governments or militaries, even in what they regard as unjustifiable wars, nor would suchassistance necessarily involve an inherent violation of professional principle (as the AAA Executive leadership has claimed in recent public proclamations). Rather, the permissibility, or in some cases even obligation, to assist one’s government when requested depends critically upon the government’s intention in lodging this request, as well as upon both what the scholar is being asked to do, and whether those specific activities would result in violations of accepted canons of professional practice. I illustrate the resulting decision dilemmas with cases of anthropologists or psychologists asked to assist in humanitarian military interventions or in mitigating or helping to end misguided or mistaken campaigns of counter-terrorism.
4. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Eric Patterson Ethics and US Af-Pak Policy: Order, Justice, and Conciliation
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Just war thinking applies to the conflict Afghanistan, particularly that underdeveloped part of the just war tradition that deals with war’s end and post-conflict (jus post bellum). This essay considers the some of the fundamental ethical challenges of the ongoing conflict in Afghanistan and neighboring Pakistan, arguing that by considering a jus post bellum framework of Order, Justice, and Conciliation we can address some of the great ethical issues faced by the US government in Afghanistan today. More specifically, this essay will focus on three ethical challenges:• The moral imperative of establishing and enduring political order.• The conflict between our ideals of justice and those of many Afghans.• Establishing a foundation for conciliation among warring parties.
articles
5. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Sarah Roberts-Cady Conflict of Interest in Industry-Sponsored Clinical Research
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Private industry funds more than half of all medical research in the United States. While industry involvement in research has benefits, it can also create conflicts of interest. The most common policies adopted to address conflict of interest in medical research are focused primarily on the ways in which industry sponsorship may undermine a clinician’s judgment regarding patient care. Insufficient attention has been given to the ways in which industry sponsorship may undermine judgment relative to the goal of scientific integrity in research. The most common conflict of interest policies do not adequately address this problem. Disclosure policies alone will not remove or ameliorate all conflicts. Further, severing or monitoring ties between clinicians and industries will not adequately address the problem, since in many cases it is not the clinicians who are making the relevant research judgments. In order to address the problem of conflict of interest inindustry-sponsored research, fundamental changes in strategy and practice must be adopted which either remove the power to make research decisions from industry employees, or increase the review of those decisions by independent investigators.
6. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Jane Duran Slavery in Global Context: Rights and Violations
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The work of Cox, Bales, Dingwaney, and others is cited in an effort to construct an argument about the special rights violations of contemporary slavery. It is contended that two forms, debt bondage and sexual slavery, are related and bear close examination.
book review
7. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
George R. Lucas, Jr. Nerds Gone Wild: Can Moore’s Law Remain Valid Indefinitely?
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book discussion
8. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Griffin Trotter, M.D., Ph.D. Review of Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Physicians at War: The Dual-Loyalties Challenge
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9. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Aine Donovan Military Physicians: The Myth of Divided Loyalties
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10. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Michael Davis The Poverty of Medical Ethics: An Argument Missing in Discussion of the “Problem of Dual Loyalties of Military Physicians”
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11. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Fritz Allhoff Physicians at War: Reply to Critics
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12. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
About the Contributors
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