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Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society

Victoria, British Columbia

Volume 13
Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Meeting

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Displaying: 1-10 of 75 documents


1. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Duane Windsor IABS - Victoria, British Columbia — 2002 Proceedings Program Chair’s Comment
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2. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Recognition of the 2002 IABS Reviewers
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3. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
About These Proceedings
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4. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Acknowledgment of Former Presidents, Conference Chairs, and Proceedings Editors
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5. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
2001-2002 Officers
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business ethics, ideology, intellectual property rights, social justice, and values
6. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Paul Dunn, Anamitra Shome Cross Cultural Ethical Differences: Canada and China
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Ethics is of concern to accountants and the accounting profession. Previous studies (Cohen, Pant & Sharp, 1995; Schultz, Johnson, Morrris & Dymes, 1993) find that accountants from different countries tend to view ethical problems differently. According to Hofstede (1980, 1991) this occurs because cultural differences influence ethical decision-making. This study extends the examination of cross-cultural differences using Hofstede's measure of national culture. It is hypothesized that cultural differences will result in accountants from China and Canada making different ethical assessments concerning the reporting of questionable accounting practices to a superior.
7. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Tara L. Ceranic Machismo y la Mordida: Toward a Theory of Masculinity and Leadership
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The Mexican cultural attribute of machismo will be considered as a major source for the proliferation of corruption throughout the government and society. It is proposed, based on previous research and biological findings, that the inclusion of more women into the government and business will reduce corruption.
8. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
J. Stephen Childers, Jr., Brad D. Geiger Trust as an Asset: The Use of Trust by Internet Firms as a Source of Competitive Advantage
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9. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Vanessa Hill, Susan Key, Tamani Taylor How Do Race and Gender Affect Organizational Socialization in University Settings?
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This study builds on research that suggests socialization-defined as the learning of important organizational values and norms—is influenced by demographic characteristics of organizational members. Socialization experiences vary among newcomers depending upon their demographic similarity to current members, and this variation affects the turnover of demographically dissimilar newcomers.
10. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Linda M. Sama, Victoria Shoaf The Internet Interface as an Impediment to Ethical Decision-Making: A Research Agenda
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Transactions over the internet pose challenges and concerns for consumers and public policy makers alike that include issues of privacy, accurate product information and quality, and protection of intellectual property rights. Our proposed research explores how ethical decision-making may differ between traditional business modes and the new internet model, and why such differences may occur.