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Displaying: 1-10 of 57 documents


1. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Patsy Lewellyn IABS - Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands — 2003 Proceedings Program Chair's Comment
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business ethics, ideology, intellectual property rights, social justice, and values
2. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Vanessa Hill, Sheryl Shivers-Blackwell My Way or the Highway: Where is the Democracy in Leadership Theories and Why Should We Care?
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3. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
David Crockett, Sonya Grier, Jacqueline A. Williams Coping with Marketplace Discrimination: An Exploration of the Experience of Black Men
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4. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Maureen Bezold Nutrition and Socioeconomic Status: An Application of Transforming Justice
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5. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Laquita C. Blockson “Wicked” Collaborations: A Possible Approach to Address Societal Issues
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6. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Darlene Bay, Kim McKeage, Jeffrey McKeage And Justice for All: A Critical Examination of the State of Business Ethics Research
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This paper suggests that an ethic of care might serve as a useful alternative to the justice perspective that is the current dominant paradigm in business ethics research. As a system of personal ethics, an ethic of care has not been used for a variety of reasons, even though it may provide some distinct advantages in discussing behavior in a business environment. On the institutional level, an ethic of care may provide a better fit than the justice perspective, allowing a clearer focus on the how business, as a system, fits into the larger society.
7. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Rosa Chun The Virtue Ethical Character of Organization: Scale Development
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8. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Paul Dunn, Ian Adamson Have Accountants Lost the Moral Right to Conduct Audits?
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Financial statement audits reduce agency costs, provide insurance to investors, and permit managers to signal their private information concerning the reliability of their firm's financial reports. However, the wake of the recent audit failures, the collapse of Arthur Anderson, independence problems when accountants provide both audit and consulting services to the same client, and investor cynicism concerning the value of audit opinions, indicate that accountants may have lost the moral right to conduct audits. We suggest that in lieu of an audit, firms should have their financial statements insured. Disclosing the level of financial statement insurance would reduce information asymmetry problems by signalling the level of financial statement reliability. Furthermore, market forces would now establish the quality of financial reporting and therefore the price of stocks.
9. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
William B. Lamb, Michael Fritz We Know We’re Mad About Enron, But What Do We Really Know About Scandals?
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Corporate scandal is a phenomenon that has rarely been studied in the management literature. Scandals can have a significant impact on the business environment and have received a high degree of attention recently in the popular press. Therefore, we propose that corporate scandals, particularly scandals related to accounting and financial wrongdoing deserve greater attention in the management literature. We offer a definition of scandal and suggest several avenues for future research that could be pursued with respect to financial and reporting scandals.
10. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Josetta McLaughlin, Gerald W. McLaughlin Ian MacNeil’s Relational Contract Theory: Linking Legal Scholarship to Current Perspectives on Social Contract
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This paper describes the work of Ian Macneil, a legal scholar advocating the use of a relational contract framework to analyze exchange relations. We present an overview of Macneil’s theory, followed by a brief comparison of his theory to four theories used by business scholars. We conclude that Macneil’s framework potentially serves as an umbrella under which other theories can be utilized to better describe behavior and the choices made.