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1. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Kelly Strong IABS - Jackson Hole Wyoming — 2004 Proceedings: Program Chair's Comment
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2. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Recognition of the 2004 IABS Reviewers
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3. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Stephanie A. Welcomer About These Proceedings
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4. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Acknowledgment of Former Presidents, Conference Chairs, and Proceedings Editors
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5. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
2003- 2004 Board of Directors and Leadership
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business ethics, ideology, intellectual property rights, social justice, and values
6. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Duane Windsor The Moral Education of Business Leaders
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This workshop session aimed at development of an eventual position statement on how to address the moral education of future business leaders in MBA and undergraduate business curricula. An object of the workshop session was to solicit input and constructive criticism from attending IABS members during the 2004 conference. A position statement would be akin to “An Open Letter on the Moral Education of Business Leaders” (however distributed) analogous and subsequent to the “An Open Letter on Business School Responsibility” (Windsor, 2002) previously circulated. A purpose of a position statement would be to assess and lay out a justification for a combination of independent (i.e., foundational) business and society and business ethics education followed by systematic infusion of business and society and business ethics perspectives into the rest of the business curricula at graduate and undergraduate levels. The task is an important one collectively for ALSB, IABS, ONE, SBE, and SIM.
7. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Brian K. Burton, Michael Goldsby, Craig P. Dunn Rossian Moral Pluralism as a Framework for Business Ethics
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In this paper we propose the question, “How can we construct ethical theories that recognize complexity in business decisions and offer persuasive moral positions?” We examine alternative positions, argue for moral pluralism as the most reasonable alternative, and examine Rossian moral pluralism as the most plausible form of pluralism to use in this project.
8. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Carter Crockett A Theory of Entrepreneurial Virtue: Balancing the Pioneering Spirit
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Amid concerns regarding the moral and social impact of the modem corporation, this paper begins its enquiry by considering the very purpose that modem business is meant to serve and the moral frameworks guiding that pursuit. In an attempt to test the applicability of an ancient theory of virtue, fieldwork has been conducted which seeks to evaluate such a framework for its conceptual power at the point of new business creation. As key Aristotelian concepts are unearthed in the study of one entrepreneurial case study, the central tenets of purpose, virtue and balance emerge as relevant concepts to consider in the context of new venture formation.
9. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Doug Jones, Steven Brenner Ethical Decision Making: Software Piracy
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The paper presents a model of ethical decision making applied to software piracy, and hypothesizes relationships among the ethical context, moral approbation, and issue-contingent factors in the decision. A study (not yet completed) is proposed to test the hypotheses, which, if supported, emphasize the important influence of work and non-work social environments in an individual’s decision to steal software.
10. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Patricia C. Kelley, Bradley R. Agle The Road Not Traveled: Ethics’ Infrastructures and Universities’ Codes of Conduct
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