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1. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Ben Wempe Conference Chair Remarks
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2. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Reviewers 2007
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3. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Jeanne M. Logsdon About These Proceedings
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4. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Acknowledgment of Past Presidents, Conference Chairs, and Proceeding Editors
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5. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
International Association for Business and Society 2006-2007 Leadership
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6. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
2007-2008 Incoming Leadership
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business ethics
7. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Miguel Alzola The Perils of the Economic Strategy to Curb Organizational Corruption
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The dominant academic paradigm and the main inspiration of anticorruption policies is the economic theory of corruption, according to which anticorruption policies should be focused on raising the costs associated with corrupt behavior. In this article, I provide three reasons to explain why anticorruption interventions in organizations inspired by the economic theory of corruption frequently fail. I contribute to the current literature by integrating the literature on constructive deviance, on personality psychology, and on managerial biases in ethical decision-making into the study of corruption and into the design and implementation of anticorruption interventions. Research propositions are advanced. Research and practice implications are discussed.
8. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Scott R. Colwell, Michael J. Zyphur Switching Costs as a Potential Motivator of Organizational Decoupling of Ethical Supplier Commitments
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Over the last decade, the news media have reported on corporate scandals involving high-profile organizations such as Arthur Anderson, AOL Time Warner,Enron, Halliburton, Kmart, and Xerox. In 2001, the Conference Board of Canada noted that supplier relationships represent some of the most common ethical problems in the private sector, and estimated that 95% of corporations in the United States and 86% of corporations in Canada have implemented ethical codes of conduct and are espousing their commitment to building relationship with ethical suppliers. While a significant amount of research on corporate ethics has been published (for examples see Akaah and Riordan 1989; Cullen et al. 2003; Román and Ruiz 2005; Schminke et al. 2005; and Weaver et al. 1999a, 1999b), what still remains unknown is how and when a supplier’s ethical code of conduct matters to the buyer making decisions regarding their choice of suppliers.
9. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Paul Dunn, Anamitra Shome Culture and Social Desirability Bias: Ethical Evaluations by Chinese and Canadian Business Students
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This study finds cultural divergence among business students from Canada and the People’s Republic of China. The Chinese and Canadian students, regardless of gender, exhibit different ethical attitudes towards questionable business practices. Also, the Canadian students, especially the women, demonstrate a stronger social desirability bias (a tendency to deny socially unacceptable actions and to admit to socially desirable ones) than do the Chinese business students. Finally, this bias causes respondents to increase their assessment of the un-ethicality of questionable business activities.
10. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Carolyn Erdener, Pedro Gabriel Márquez Pérez, Joaquin Flores Mendez Cultural Perspectives of Managerial Ethics and Corruption
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International business enterprises face a number of ethical issues when conducting business in unfamiliar parts of the world, especially in places wherecorruption is deeply rooted. This is the situation in Latin America - a highly heterogeneous region characterized by cultural complexity, inconsistencies, andcontradictions at multiple levels of society, with implications for business ethics that are potentially as troubling to outsiders as they are opaque.We briefly indicate the relevant academic literature on this subject, noting that studies of business ethics in Latin America are surprisingly sparse, fragmented, and uneven in comparison with the abundance of published research on business ethics and values in other world regions. Given the importance of Latin American markets, production capacity, raw materials, and economic growth, we identify this situation as a challenge and opportunity for business ethics researchers. Examination of these issues contributes new information and insight into the realities of doing business in emerging market countries and is critical on a theoretical as well as a practical level.