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Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society

Tampere, Finland

Volume 19
Proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Meeting

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Displaying: 1-20 of 60 documents


1. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
Kathleen Rehbein Conference Chair Remarks
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2. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
IABS 2008 Reviewers
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3. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
Ronald M. Roman About These Proceedings
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4. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
Acknowledgement of IABS Past Presidents, Conference Chairs, and Proceedings Editors
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5. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
2007-2008 IABS Leadership
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6. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
2008-2009 Incoming IABS Leadership
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business ethics (including ideology, property rights, social justice, and values)
7. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
Marjo Siltaoja, Meri Vehkaperä Constructing Illegitimacy?: Cartels In Finnish Business Media
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During the past decade, any questionable and illegal behavior of businesses has received significant attention in the media. Thus, taking a critical discursive approach, we investigate how the media constructs any questionable business as illegitimate. Our data draws upon articles dealing with cartels and cartel agreements in Finnish business media covering a five year period 2002-2007. Based on our findings, we suggest that regardless of the globalized business world, socio-cultural history plays an important role in constructing the illegitimacy of business practices.
8. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
Jukka M. Laitamaki, Raija Järvinen, Uolevi Lehtinen Irrational Consumer Behavior in Financial Services: Implications for the Finnish Business and Society
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Consumer driven and globally competitive financial markets are crucial for the future prosperity of the Finnish society (Laitamäki, Lehti and Paasio 1996). The largest transfer of wealth in history is currently taking place as Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) prepare for their retirement and inherit the assets of the previous generation. Due to cognitive limitations and emotional biases these consumers don’t always make rational decisions with financial services. This conceptual study addresses irrational financial consumer behavior and its impact on the Finnish business and society. The study focuses on two research questions: 1) What type of behavioral finance concepts explain irrational consumer behavior? 2) What are the implications of these behaviors for the Finnish business and society? The purpose of this study is to assist individual consumers, business leaders and policy makers in making better financial services related decisions in Finland. The need for better decisions has been illustrated during Finnish and international financial crises including the US sub-prime loan turmoil in 2008.
9. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
Carlos Manuel Coelho Duarte, José P. Esperança, José D. Curto, Maria C. Santos Do Discrimination and Segregation Subsist in Pay Policies?: The Evidence from Portugal
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This paper analyses the gender pay determinants between top and lower level of Portuguese employees. A relatively large data pool, for 2003, covering business functions hitherto neglected, sheds a new light into the factors that lead to the earnings of men and women. Our analysis combines human capital with internal-labour-markets theories. Our findings allow the identification of jobsegregation as one important source of the gender pay gap. Moreover, they confirm that earnings are determined by different factors and suggest a reasonable opportunity for women to combine career and family.
10. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
William P. Smith You’ve Been Tagged! (Then Again, Maybe Not): Employers and Web-Based Social Networking
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Social networking sites (SNS) such as MySpace and Facebook have become among the most popular sites on the Internet. The extent of self-disclosure on these sites makes them an attractive source of information for employers. This paper reviews the advantages and criticisms of SNS use during the recruiting and selection process, the existing research on SNS and consider legal and normative implications of this trend.
11. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
A. Scott Carson Codes of Ethics: Rationality, Reasonableness and Implementing Codes as Ethical Education
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This paper presents a philosophical critique of intuitionism and other current theories of rationality that underlie and, in some cases, question the cogency of codes of ethics. A classical theory of rationality is defended and a concept of ‘reasonableness’ is developed as an ideal-type in setting out the principles for an effective ethical education that can form the basis for implementing a code of conduct.
12. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
Raminta Pučėtaitė, Anna-Maija Lämsä Building Organizational Trust with Ethical Organizational Practices: Empirical Evidence from a Post-Socialist Context
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The paper explores the possibility to develop organizational trust in companies operating in a post-socialist society where trust is rather low due to certain socio-historical processes. They determined a number of ethical problems which diminish trust both at the societal and the organizational levels. It is argued that trust can be advanced by organizational efforts, namely, ethical organizational practices. The interrelations among organizational trust, ethical problems and ethical organizational practices are empirically tested, the primary findings and directions for further research are discussed.
13. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
Jacqueline N. Hood, Jeanne M. Logsdon The Influence of Organizational Culture Type on Forms of Bullying Behavior
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Bullying in organizations is receiving more attention by managers, public policy makers, and scholars. This paper adds to the literature by examining how the culture of an organization may influence the frequency and types of bullying behavior that are predicted to occur. We develop propositions and examine measurement instruments in preparation for an empirical study.
14. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
John R. Schermerhorn, Jr., William B. Lamb Social Agency in International Business Practices: Perspectives on Principled Constructive Engagement
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Constructive engagement in international business practice is defined as purpose-driven behavior in which economic contributions by the foreign investor also advance social progress in the host country. This paper distinguishes between amoral and moral social agency, and proposes a model of principled constructive engagement that describes a principled constructive engagement regime enacted in a disciplined, morally-directed manner.
15. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
John B. Bingham, Jeffery A. Thompson, James Oldroyd, Jeffrey S. Bednar, J. Stuart Bunderson The Effects of Ideological Work Beliefs on Organizational Influence: Shaping Social Networks Through the Psychological Contract
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We explore psychological contracts as mechanisms by which individuals gain influence in organizations. Using two distinct research settings and longitudinal analysis, we demonstrate that ideological contracts endow individuals with increased centrality in the organization’s influence network. More generally, we propose that an important outcome of different psychological contract types may be how they affect the nature of influence in organizations.
corporate social responsibility and social performance (including corporatecitizenship, corporate philanthropy, social investing, social responsiveness, andstewardship)
16. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
Adam Adrien-Kirby, Stephen Brammer, Andrew Millington The Effect of Isomorphic Pressure on Socially and Environmentally Responsible Procurement in the United Kingdom
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This study assesses the impact had by institutional isomorphic pressures in the organisational fields of 185 businesses operating within the United Kingdom. The emphasis throughout is on how external institutions affect the socially and environmentally responsible aspects of an organization’s purchasing practice. Factor analyses and a linear regression model are employed to test the influence of these pressures. Initial findings suggest that what other industry participants are doing in this area is not as important in affecting the procurement practice of the focal organisation as is the managers’ perception of how legitimacy is awarded by stakeholders and, indeed, if competitors with well-developed social and environmental supply chain management programs are perceived favourably in the industry.
corporate social responsibility and social performance (including corporate
17. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
Stefan Hoejmose, Stephen Brammer, Andrew Millington Competition, Strategy and Socially and Environmentally Responsible Procurement
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This paper examines how competition and competitive strategy influence companies’ propensity to engage in socially and environmentally responsible procurement processes (SERP). We interview 141 British procurement managers, on their perception of their company’s competitive strategy and the competitive environment in which they operating in. In addition, participants were asked how important responsible procurement was for their overall business and their strategy.Our results suggest that companies that produce a differentiated product engage in relatively proactive SERP process, compared to their counterparties, who aimed to produce a product at the lowest price possible.
18. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
Eeva Laine, Matias Laine A Fair Trade ATO in a Period of Transition
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The popularity of Fair Trade is increasing swiftly in many parts of the World. However, there is still a paucity of research analysing the northern fair trade actors outside the Anglo-American communities. This paper contributes by presenting a qualitative study of how the Finnish World Shop movements’ key actors understand the movement’s role and position in the rapidly changing operating environment. The study depicts the polyphonic nature of this particular democratic social movement and discusses how success, public trust and the importance of different stakeholders become constructed in various ways within it.
19. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
José A. Puppim De Oliveira Social Upgrading Among Small Enterprises and Clusters in Developing Countries: New Challenges for Governance
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Many clusters of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Less Developed Countries (LDC) are counteracting the “race to the bottom” by becoming competitive while at the same time “socially upgrading” in order to successfully improve their innovation capacity, social, environmental and labor standards, and health-and-safety issues. There is significant literature on the competitiveness of clusters and SMEs, but little research about how and why competitive small firms in LDCs are socially upgrading. Issues such as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and public policies have influenced the initiatives for cluster social upgrading. The objective of this article is to discuss a conceptual framework to understand what factors may lead SMEs to organize themselves to overcome obstacles to collective action for social upgrading.The traditional cluster literature relies on the internal dynamics of the clusters for upgrading. Through interaction among cluster members (firms, supporting organizations, etc.), firms would learn from each other. This would help firms to innovate and develop new products, processes, functions and markets. Besides this literature, three other basic frameworks that explain the way firms can upgrade have been developed recently in the literature: upgrading through markets, through CSR and through better enforcement of regulation. Those frameworks can bring certain insights to a better understanding of social upgrading.
20. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2008
Adele Queiroz Business Response to Increasing Social Expectations: Identifying New Organizational Forms
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