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1. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Jamie R. Hendry Conference Chair Remarks
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2. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
IABS 2009 Reviewers
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3. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Ronald M. Roman About These Proceedings
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4. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Acknowledgement of IABS Past Presidents, Conference Chairs, and Proceedings Editors
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5. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
2008-2009 IABS Leadership
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6. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
2009-2010 Incoming IABS Leadership
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business ethics
7. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Craig B. Caldwell, Brian Pfanschmidt, Burdeane Orris The Effects of Deontological and Teleological Ethical Systems of Immediate Supervisors on Employee Trust
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This research seeks to extend the literature of trust by examining whether the amount of trust that employees have in their supervisors is contingent upon the ethical system of belief utilized by their immediate supervisors. To help answer this question, it is hypothesized that employees have a greater degree of trust in immediate supervisors practicing the deontological ethical system of belief than in those practicing the teleological ethical system of belief. This study begins the search for the moral frameworks that are the antecedents of trust in immediate supervisors. The results indicate that practicing a deontological approach to ethics may stimulate a greater degree of employee trust in immediate supervisors than a teleological approach; therefore, the ethical system of belief held by immediate supervisors affects his or her employees.
8. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Robert P. Marble, Beverly Kracher Development of a Model For Describing The Ethical Climate of a Business Community
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The paper describes the development of a model for representing the ethical climate of a business community. It describes the steps followed in identifying the model’s components and in validating the model’s structure through use of expert panels. The expert panel validation methodology has yielded a weighting scheme for use in the model’s eventual operationalization, whose derivation, together with the analysis performed on qualitative discoveries of the process, is described. The model’s development is part of a larger research project that is intended to result in a validated instrument for measuring and comparing ethical climates of different business communities and for assessing longitudinal progress of individual business communities. The project’s ultimate goal is to provide an index measure that can also serve as a “report card” assessment tool at a level of analysis, which has not yet been addressed in the literature – that of the business community.
9. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Scott R. Colwell, Theodore J. Noseworthy When We Confuse Market Economics as Market Ethics: Evidence from an Event Study
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While evidence exists suggesting that irresponsible corporate behaviour may lead to decreased shareholder wealth (Frooman 1997), one cannot help but question the generalizability of these results when companies such as Exxon, an organization well known for its environmental problems, remains at the top of the 2006 Fortune 500 list. In this paper we show with regards to news of irresponsible behaviour, the market punishes smaller, less capitalized firms but not necessarily the very large and highly capitalized companies.
10. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Duane Windsor Global Justice and Global Climate Change: A Discussion of the Relationship
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Global climate change has very significant implications for the theory and practice of global justice. Climate change, whether generated by natural processes or human activities, generates uneven distribution of negative and net impacts across individuals, groups, and countries. Sources of climate change due to human activities, and also capacity to respond to climate change, are similarly unevenly distributed. Distributions of sources, impacts, and capacity are likely quite different from one another. In this context, justice concerns who should bear the final real burden of climate change and of actions to mitigate, halt, and reverse climate change. This final real burden is interdependent with global poverty.
corporate social responsibility and social performance
11. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Sara A. Morris Corporate Targets of Shareholder Resolutions: What Do Green Resolutions and Poor Employee Relations Mean?
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This study examines social issues shareholder resolutions filed at S&P 500 companies in 2007. These firms received 86% of all social issues resolutions filed. Findings indicate that green resolutions were the most common single type (30% of social issues resolutions), but nearly one third (32%) of resolutions contained non-traditional content. Firms were more likely to be targeted if they were large in size and demonstrated poor treatment of employees and customers. As might be expected, the primary sponsors of social issues resolutions were socially responsible investment funds, religious groups, and pension funds. Surprisingly, over half (52%) of resolutions made it onto proxy ballots in 2007, while there was sufficient dialogue between the target companies and shareholder activists for filers to withdraw only 29% of the resolutions (although 41% of green resolutions were withdrawn). Resolution content and firm response differed by type of filer.
12. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Linda C. Rodríguez, Jane LeMaster CSR and the SEC: Totally Certifiable!
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Previously, Rodriguez & LeMaster (2007) recommended that the SEC issue a “CSR Seal of Approval” for companies that voluntarily disclose their corporate social responsibility (CSR) projects. That work lacks the strength of third or fourth-party accreditation. This paper recommends that the SEC issue an accreditation grade of A, B, B-, or C to provide strength to the “CSR Seal of Approval” and to help companies indicate the quality of company CSR programs. By issuing an accredited “CSR Seal of Approval,” all stakeholders benefit because companies can incorporate CSR into their strategies and achieve recognition for their CSR projects. The premise of the accreditation concept support the original authors notion of letting CSR remain voluntary and not legislated; thus, all companies (small, medium, large, foreign or domestic) maintain competitive advantage by not incurring additional regulated costs.
13. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Bilge Uyan-Atay, Stephen Brammer, Andrew Millington Explaining the Process of Corporate Community Involvement Through the Perspective of the Behavioral Theory of the Firm
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In this study, we aim to illustrate the process of corporate community involvement (CCI) decision-making and the choice of corporate community involvement behaviors within the confines of behavioral theory of the firm. Case study approach will be taken for this study. Four different genres of companies are chosen in Turkey (e.g. multinational, holding company, subsidiary, joint venture). Five core concepts of the behavioral theory of the firm are studied and analyzed based on the findings related to corporate community involvement decisions process of the 4 studied companies.
14. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Anne T. Lawrence, Gordon Rands, Mark Starik Corporate Social Responsibility, Citizenship, and Sustainability Officers In Fortune 250 Firms
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This paper summarizes a discussion session investigating the corporate representatives behind corporate citizenship and sustainability initiatives.
15. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Dr. Felissa K. Lee,, Dr. James E. Mattingly, Dr. Felissa K. Lee Using Stakeholder Orientation to Explain Candidate Attraction to Specific Corporate Social Practices
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Early research examining the relationship between corporate social practices and candidate attraction generally concludes that prospective employees prefer to be affiliated with socially responsible organizations (Dolan, 1997; Greening & Turban, 2000; Turban & Greening, 1996). A basic assumption embedded in these studies is that there is a generalized consensus among job candidates regarding the factors that constitute a desirable social record. Our project challenges this assumption and seeks to uncover variation among prospective job candidates’ attraction to specific organizations’ social practices. We draw on the model of stakeholder orientation outlined by Mitroff (1983) to build a theoretical framework to explain variations in candidate attraction to specific practices and to guide the development of propositions that outline how candidates might be attracted to certain practices. Analysis of pilot data provides an illustration of how various corporate social practices cluster in a manner that is consistent with the theoretical propositions.
16. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Elena Cavagnaro, Yvonne Burema On Small Steps and Big Leaps: Exploring the Perception of CSR, its Rewards and Difficulties by Micro Firms in the North Netherlands
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Across Europe, micro firms (SMEs with up to 10 employees) account for the vast majority of business activities. Supporting micro firms in the transition towards sustainability is essential: many small steps will result in a big leap. To this scope knowledge is needed on the specific challenges encountered by micro firms in the region they operate in. The research presented here offers a contribution to this knowledge. It explores the perception of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), its rewards and difficulties by micro firms in Frisia, Groningen and Drenthe - the three Northern provinces of The Netherlands.
17. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Eliseu Vieira Machado Júnior Corporate Social Performance: A Case Study for Hopkins and Wood’s Framework in Brazilian Confessional Universities
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The social responsibility field in the organizations has become recently a subject scholars have debated. Despite of the huge discussion regarding to this concept, there is no consensus. Still, there is a confusion related to “social actions,” this way reducing the social responsibility scope as a philanthropic activity. This reductionism is inadequate, distorting the essence of what is supposed to be a socially responsible conduct. The present proposal intends to evaluate enterprises in the Corporate Social Responsibility – CSR. This research will investigate confessional universities in Brazil, which are organizations in higher education that have a relationship with a specific church(s) or religion and are ordinarily dependent upon that religion, through sponsorship and/or board oversight. These universities are skilled in financial reporting, but they have no good process for evaluating and reporting on the programs, activities, and outcomes that relate more directly to their educational and service missions. This paper shows the Brazilian universities scenario on CSR, describes the Hopkins and Wood’s framework followed by an evaluation of a small group of universities through a survey. From the outcomes, the framework may be reformulated, finally displaying the elements to future research and its implications.
environmental management and regulation
18. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
David L. Ferguson Drivers and Inhibitors of Corporate Sustainability Performance in Practice
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Little has been published about the drivers, factors and challenges involved in the business practice of creating corporate sustainability performance within a company. This working paper describes research that employed an in-depth, grounded-theory case study approach to explore the issue within two EU-based utility companies. From the analysis of interviews, project meeting observations and a survey with in-house delivery experts, a key preliminary output of this research has been the creation of a Force-Factor Corporate Sustainability Performance Framework that categorises the main driver and inhibitor elements a dynamic, explanatory model. This can serve as a useful platform for further academic and practitioner-based research, as well as describing key levers and obstacles to establishing a progressive performance in corporate sustainability.
19. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Stefan Hoejmose, Stephen Brammer, Andrew Millington Industry Life Cycle and Responsible Procurement
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Different stages of the product and industry life cycle has been argued to be an important factor in shaping firms’ strategic actions, as the life cycle influence the firms’ sales, profit, product innovation, marketing mix and differentiation strategies. Drawing on the theory of industry life cycle (ILC), this article examines how the ILC influences firms’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance in the context of global procurement transactions. The findings suggest that mature industries have much greater levels of responsible procurement (RP) processes, compared to rapid growing and declining industries. The authors conclude that CSR in procurement transactions is a trait of changes in the strategic behaviour of firms, as they progress from the ILC stage of growth to maturity and decline, rather than being a by-product of supply chain sophistication, which also develops along the ILC.
20. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2009
Scott R. Colwell, Ashwin W. Joshi Multi-Item Scale Development for Measuring Institutional Pressures in the Context of Corporate Environmental Action
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Prior research has shown the importance of institutional pressures in investigating corporate environmental behaviour. To date, the literature has been lacking in survey-based reflective measures of institutional pressures. This paper focuses on the development of reflective measures of coercive, mimetic, and normative isomorphism.