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Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society

Volume 27
Proceedings of the Twenty-Seventh Annual Meeting

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Displaying: 1-10 of 30 documents


1. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
About These Proceedings
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2. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Rebekah Inez Brau, A Framework for Teaching the Goal of the Firm in Introductory Business Classes: Shareholder Wealth Maximization Ethicality and Classical Philosophical Paradigms
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In many business textbooks and courses, particularly in finance curricula, students continue to be taught that the single goal of the firm is shareholder wealth maximization (SWM). Although this statement presents a clear and succinct goal, which adheres well to rational expectations and financial economic models, I argue it is over simplistic and may actually be detrimental to student learning and professional conduct. A strict adherence to the SWM goal has at least anecdotal evidence of cases in which business students act unethically after graduating. In this article I propose a framework that includes a discussion of four classical ethics camps vis-à-vis SWM in foundational business classes. I assume students have not yet had a philosophical or business ethics course and begin the discussion from the ground up.
3. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Jerry Calton, Stephanie Welcomer, Mark Haggerty, Linda Sama, Local Food Networks as Communities of Practice: An Action Research Agenda
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The purpose of our workshop was to call attention to emerging communities of practice where academics and community activists are coming together to learn how to grow slow food networks. One expression of this movement is the creation of local food hubs which can potentially forge global links that scale up to forge a global action network or GAN (Waddell, 2011).
4. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Alan P. Christenson, Marc-Charles Ingerson, Business Law, Religion, and Pro-Social Behavior in the Workplace
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Business Law and Religion has long been one of the more intriguing and misunderstood partnerships in contemporary American Society. One of the main purposes of this paper is to make clearer and more helpful the boundary conditions between this partnership from the specific perspective of American Jurisprudence.
5. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Nabil Daoudi, Craig P. Dunn, Disbanding The Dark Side of Organizations: Towards an Understanding of Corporate Social Irresponsibility in the MENA region
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The discussion of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has tended to overlook corporate social irresponsibility (CSI) in global markets. This is particularly the case for discussions of the Arab world in which institutional elements such as wasta (to be defined later) and fatalism play a key role in both the conception and outcomes of CSI.
6. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Jennifer DeBoer, Rajat Panwar, Jorge Rivera, Pristine Neighborhoods, Progressive Neighbors: Toward a Place-Based Understanding of Firms’ Voluntary Environmental Behaviors
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Management research has extensively considered who, what, when, why, which, and how aspects pertaining to firms’ proactive environmental strategies, yet where aspects have received remarkably less attention. Building on institutional theory and economic geography, we explore three place-based research questions relating social and physical attributes of a place with a firm’s proactive environmental strategies. We contribute to a better understanding of the role of place in three ways. First, we find that geographic concentration of environmentally proactive firms is positively related to firm commitment in a voluntary environmental program (VEP). Second, we find that firm proximity to a sacrosanct environment is positively related to firm commitment in a VEP. Finally, we integrate these effects and find that social and physical attributes of a place have an interactive effect of firms’ voluntary environmental commitment in a VEP. We address our research questions in the context of the Costa Rican tourism industry.
7. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
John T. Haynes, Linda C. Rodriguez, EMERGENCY, EMERGENCY!: Local Emergency Manager Perspectives On Partnerships With Defense Services For Emergencies
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This case study explores local North Carolina emergency manager perspectives on Defense Support (US Military) to Civil Authorities (DSCA). We ask a) How do county emergency managers integrate DSCA to prepare for disasters, and b) What factors do emergency managers consider when integrating DSCA into response and recovery activities. The reason why this study is important is that the results provide detailed and rich data for local emergency managers, and offers possibilities to improve collaborative emergency responses between various local, state, and national emergency management agencies. Moreover, the study outcomes can help key leaders in emergency agencies to improve education and training to facilitate local emergency management through DSCA.
8. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Eli C.S. Jamison, Considering the Power of “Social” in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): Power as Enabling Pre-Condition for Meaningful CSR in Alabama’s Poultry Industry
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This paper was presented as a workshop session and considers how preexisting contexts of power inhibit or enable firm corporate social responsibility actions when the issue is a hotly contested social and political issue: immigrant labor in the American South. This research examines the impact of the passage and implementation of the 2011 Alabama Immigration Law on the state’s poultry processing industry through a discourse and content analysis. By using an adaption of Clegg’s Circuits of Power theory, the intersection of economic identity and political influence of the state poultry industry is analyzed within the power flows of Alabama’s economic network. This work is part of a broader study and contributes to CSR literatures through a focus on the role of pre-existing conditions of power on firm effectiveness in achieving CSR outcomes.
9. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Denise Kleinrichert, Social Entrepreneurship – Crossroads And Intersections
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Social entrepreneurs mark a distinct business form of market enterprise. These business ventures achieve positive entrepreneurial social change for underrepresented stakeholders in uncertain markets. Markets are rarely certain. The business and society field continues to shape the narrative about what business looks like, and how it tells its story to the market, our students and fellow scholars. Social entrepreneurship is the new wave of the intersection between individual entrepreneurship and corporate social responsibility (CSR) models. There are no social entrepreneurial road maps – for business development, strategy, operations, or delivery. Social entrepreneurs eschew historical profit-driven market venture models. Indifferent, profit-driven market players are contradictory to the social entrepreneurs’ mission. This paper pursues theoretical underpinnings of social entrepreneurship at the crossroads of business and society using a new narrative.
10. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Michael Kohlgrüber, The Emergence and Diffusion of Sustainable Business Model Innovations in Retail Logistics From an Institutional Theory Perspective
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In this paper empirical findings and theoretical explanations are presented on how sustainable business model innovations emerge and diffuse in the practices of retail logistics companies. This entails different forms of sustainable business model innovations (BMI) depending on the type of company as well as different interacting factors that drive their emergence and diffusion. This paper contends that neither the institutional environment nor the initiatives of agents alone can explain these processes but an intersection between both can do – within an institutional theory. This means that win-win-situations between companies and relevant stakeholders are an important precondition for sustainable business model innovations. There are also intersections of different reasons driving the emergence and diffusion of sustainable BMI. These reasons are legitimacy, instrumentally rational and value-rational reasons.