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Displaying: 1-10 of 37 documents


1. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
About These Proceedings
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2. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Joy E. Beatty, Jennifer S. A. Leigh, Jegoo Lee Go Big or Go Home: Big Data Analytics for Big Business & Society
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Big data analysis is sweeping the natural sciences, industry, and the digital humanities, but what about business and society? The purpose of this session is to facilitate a conversation about the relationship of big data and data science analytics and their relevance to the business and society community in our roles as researchers, reviewers, editors, and scholars. We will discuss the benefits and challenges of big data analysis, and comparisons of big data methods with traditional quantitative and qualitative methods. We will offer a brief example of a topic modelling analysis, and will invite participants to consider the possibilities for using big data analysis in their business and society research.
3. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Frederik Dahlmann, Johanne Ward-Grosvold Environmental Managers and Organisational Ambidexterity
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This paper develops the outlines of a research proposal asking how do environmental managers engage in organisational ambidexterity in order to bridge the competing institutional logics defining and affecting their roles and practices? Drawing on a conceptual framework of organisational ambidexterity we seek to explore how environmental managers manage the competing institutional logics defining and affecting their roles and practices. Using qualitative inductive analysis on interviews with a multitude of UK firms undertaken at the height of the global financial crisis, we plan to examine the organizational capabilities required for dealing with the ethical and strategic trade-offs between meeting economic and ecological organizational objectives, and thus address questions around how companies can move from ambition to more lasting impact.
4. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
D. Kirk Davidson Employee Rights in a 3-D CSR World
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This paper explores the dramatic changes in the employer-employee relationship over the past several decades and the implications for the concept of employee rights.
5. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Robbin Derry Intersectional Feminist Ethics in an Era of Gender Fluidity
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The fields of applied and professional ethics have accepted the Ethics of Care as the definitive feminist ethics for nearly three decades. Feminism has moved on to embrace the intersectional study of gender, race, and class in identifying key issues and methods, but scholarship in business ethics has not yet adopted intersectional feminism. Further, our understanding of gender is rapidly shifting. Whereas second wave feminism was articulated on the basis of widely accepted norms of gender as a dichotomous variable, gender is now understood to be less essential, more fluid, and entirely socially constructed. This raises challenging questions about what feminism represents, and therefore what feminist ethics is.
6. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Virginia W. Gerde, Jonathan Handy, D.J. Masson Are Hedge Funds The Big, Bad Wolf?
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In general, hedge fund activist investors primarily seek to increase their equity value; however, such actions can arise from other intentions and can result in unforeseen consequences. We examine how hedge fund activism during the 1994-2007 period has impacted US companies and their subsequent environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance. Specifically, we compare prior company ESG performance with that occurring after being targeted by a hedge fund activist investor. We use ESG ratings in a panel data analysis with stakeholder dimensions of the natural environment, the community, diversity, employees, consumers, and specific governance elements. For those firms targeted by hedge fund activists, we found that the number of environmental concerns decreased while the number of corporate governance strengths increased. Social performance was generally worse after being targeted, as targeted firms had fewer strengths in the employee, community, and product dimensions and more concerns in the employee and diversity dimensions.
7. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Virginia W. Gerde, J. Aaron Simmons Where Do We Go From Here: How do Recent Political and Economic Changes Affect Our Ambitions and Impacts as Business and Society Scholars?
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Two 2016 events highlighted the rise of nationalism: (1) the election of Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election, and (2) Brexit, the UK vote to withdraw from the European Union. We as scholars and teachers and our students as global citizens entering the workforce were and are experiencing increased political and social tensions in both hemispheres and amplified uncertainty. In this presentation, we sought to open a dialogue on the language we use in business and society research and teaching as well as the underlying, often unmentioned, assumptions underlying our studies and pedagogy.
8. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Jean-Pascal Gond, Sébastien Mena, Szilvia Mosonyi Meta-Reviewing the Business and Society Field through Sociological Paradigms: Towards Pluralistic Re-Presentations of Corporate Social Responsibility
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Although the growth of the field of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) calls for more diverse exercises of reviewing, most reviews of CSR research present the organising categories on which they build as taken-for-granted. In so doing, they reify a structural-functionalist orientation and a linear view of time while failing to represent accurately alternative post-structural and anti-structural CSR paradigms. Building on an analysis of 40 reviews of the CSR field and on insights from the social studies of science, this paper revisits the notion of field re-presentation and highlights the need for building on categories, which embed a richer set of ontological assumptions to represent the CSR field in a manner that could maintain a dose of ontological and epistemological pluralism and diversity. We finally discuss the implications of our analysis to enhance CSR theory-building, cross-fertilize insights from distinct CSR paradigms and develop alternative assumptions to investigate empirically CSR phenomena.
9. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Jean-Pascal Gond, Laurence Vigneau How Do Measures Become Academically Acceptable?: A Case Study of the Kinder Lydenberg and Domini (KLD) database
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Although measurement is central to knowledge production, little is known about the process by which a dataset becomes accepted by academics as an appropriate way of measuring a phenomenon. Relying on actor-network theory and prior studies of the construction of organizational knowledge, and using the Kinder Lydenberg and Domini (KLD) database as a case, we analyze the activities that enabled the adoption of this dataset. Informed by a systematic content analysis of 573 articles referring to KLD and interviews with KLD experts, we develop a process model that explains how datasets become accepted in academia and linked to theoretical concepts. In making visible the practical, symbolic and conceptual work that underlie a dataset adoption in academia, we show how academics can potentially be influenced by practitioners through metrics. Our findings also highlight the importance of reflexivity and mindfulness in the use of datasets.
10. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Jason Good, Paloma Vargas, Blanca Lopez, Bryan W. Husted The Voice of History: What Can the Ancient Aztecs Tell Us About Universal Business Norms?
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This study explores the role of history in establishing the universality of business norms, which is largely missing from the Integrated Social Contracts Theory literature. We apply a grounded theory methodology to business-oriented parts of The Florentine Codex, which documents a 16th century study of Nahua society (of which the Aztecs were a part). In doing so we derive six business norms operating in 16th century Nahua society: ‘care for others,’ ‘exercise prudence,’ ‘tell the truth,’ ‘be respectful of others,’ ‘show reverence to the gods,’ and ‘be humble.’ From these findings we discuss relationships between these norms and the norms operating in current-day global business society, and argue that studies of universal norms should account for the role of time in establishing their universality.