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Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy

Volume 12, Issue 2, Spring 2008
Philosophy in Translation

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1. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Walter Brogan

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2. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
F. W. J. Schelling, Adam Arola, Jena Jolissaint, Peter Warneck

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3. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Peter Warnek

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The paper explores a connection between Schelling’s celebrated Freedom Essay and Plato’s Timaeus by considering the importance of Schelling’s translation of a phrase found in the Platonic dialogue in which Timaeus expresses the limits of human discourse, speaking of it as a kind of “bastard reasoning.” These limits are said to arise necessarily through the progression of the inquiry carried out by Timaeus. Schelling’s own resistance to viewing his inquiry determined by such limits and such necessity is highlighted by the fact that he curiously translates the phrase as “false imagination” or sin. The paper questions the reasons for such resistance given the striking structural similarity between the Timaeus and Schelling’s own essay. The paper concludes that Schelling’s thinking of the “unground” is comparable to the chorological interruption enacted in the Timaeus, but that Schelling does not consider how such an interruption bears upon God’s word. The paper thus points to a self-estranging necessity at the heart of all discourse and thought.
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4. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
F. W. J. Schelling, Andrew A. Davis, Alexi I. Kukuljevic

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5. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Friedrich Hölderlin, David Farrell Krell

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6. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Markus Zisselsberger

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Starting from the premise that what calls for and happens in the work and thinking of translation is inseparable from the experience of reading Heidegger’sphilosophy, this article suggests that translation in Heidegger’s work is a philosophical problem fundamentally implicated in the thinking of Being. The article first examines Heidegger’s distinction between Übersetzen—a form of translation that seeks correspondences between words of different languages, and Übersetzen—a translation within one’s own language that seeks to respond to the “claim” of language itself. The second part of the article links translation with Heidegger’s later reflections on language in Unterwegs zur Sprache, arguing that what is at stake in the work of translation is a thinking of our relation to language. Focusing on the notion of “usage/Brauch,” it concludes with the suggestion that insofar as thinking translation according to (and with) Heidegger requires a “response” to the claim of language, it also calls for a more sustained engagement with the question of how the human is claimed and used by language.
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7. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Martin Heidegger, Markus Zisselsberger

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8. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Kōichi Tsujimura, Martin Heidegger, Richard Capobianco

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9. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Jean-François Courtine, Christopher Cohoon

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