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Displaying: 1-11 of 11 documents


features
1. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Jay Odenbaugh Subsistence versus Sustainable Emissions? Equity and Climate Change
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In this essay, I first consider what the implications of global climate change will be regarding issues of equity. Secondly, I consider two types of proposals which focus on sustainable emissions and subsistence rights respectively. Thirdly, I consider where these proposal types conflict. Lastly, I argue under plausible assumptions, these two proposals actually imply similar policies regarding global climate change.
2. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
David Henderson Valuing the Stars: On the Economics of Light Pollution
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The night sky has been radically altered by light pollution, artificially produced light that obscures the stars. The effects and costs of this are diverse and poorly appreciated. A survey of the economically quantifiable aspects of this problem demonstrates that the value of the starry sky is immense, and yet it remains stubbornly beyond the ken of the market. The attempts to quantify this value and the ultimate impossibility of the task give lie to the economic pretense that the dollar can commensurate all value. The case of light pollution exemplifies the importance of regulation to the protection of environmental value.
3. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Brian Treanor Turn Around and Step Forward: Ideology and Utopia in the Environmental Movement
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Insufficiently radical environmentalism is inadequate to the problems that confront us; but overly radical environmentalism risks alienating people with whom, in a democracy, we must find common cause. Building on Paul Ricoeur’s work, which shows how group identity is constituted by the tension between ideology and utopia, this essay asks just how radical effective environmentalism should be. Two “case studies” of environmental agenda—that of Michael Schellenberger and Ted Nordhaus, and that of David Brower—serve to frame the important issues of cooperation and confrontation. The essay concludes that environmentalism must lead with its utopian aspirations rather than its willingness to compromise.
4. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Hui Zou The Philosophical Encounter Embodied by the Yuanming Yuan
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The Yuanming Yuan of the Qing dynasty was a magnificent imperial garden in Chinese history. The garden consisted of three Chinese gardens and a “Western-like garden” designed by the EuropeanJesuits. The garden encounter in the Yuanming Yuan provides a valuable case for studying cultural fusion in early modernity. This article redraws the traditional line of Daoist cosmology in Chinese imperial gardens by analyzing the fengshui layout of the Yuanming Yuan. Based on the Qing emperors’ writings, imperial archives, and the garden representations, the research interprets the design distinction and its cross-cultural accommodation. The article concludes that the exotic depth produced by the linear-perspective views in the European portion demonstrated the typical Daoist attempt of preserving full brightness in one’s mind through seeking the remotest garden scenery, as stated in the Daoist scripture Laozi that “whoever knows his brightness veils himself in his darkness.” This Daoist paradoxical idea, best embodied by the Yuanming Yuan, opens up a comparative understanding of Heidegger’s concept “paradoxa.”
5. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Randall Teal The Process of Place: A Temporal View of Sustainability in the Built Environment
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In the process of creating our built environments, the threat of ecological crises often tempt us to focus on “fixes” of resource management and technological innovation. Yet if such approaches overwhelm the significance of place and our complex existential engagements within those places, then the earth becomes a mere collection of resources. Sustainability undertaken in such a categorical manner results in environments that are either nostalgic or alienating, and neither is sustainable. Sustainability becomes a holistic movement capable of coping with both the specific and peculiar when it is undertaken as a recurring process of response.
book reviews
6. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Meg Mott Thin Places: A Pilgrimage Home
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7. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Brett Buchanan Animal Lessons: How They Teach Us to Be Human
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8. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Bruce V. Foltz Theological Foundations for Environmental Ethics: Reconstructing Patristic and Medieval Concepts
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9. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
David Kolb An Honorable Harvest: Shakers and the Natural World
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10. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Adam Konopka Merleau-Ponty’s Philosophy of Nature
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about the cover
11. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Adam Novick About the Cover: Portrait of a Nature-Society Hybrid
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