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news and notes
1. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 14 > Issue: 4
NEWS AND NOTES
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features
2. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 14 > Issue: 4
Peter Quigley Rethinking Resistance: Environmentalism, Literature, and Poststructural Theory
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I argue that with the advent of poststructuralism, traditional theories of representation, truth, and resistance have been seriously brought into question. References to the “natural” and the “wild” cannot escape the poststructural attack against foundational concepts and the constituting character of human-centered language. I explore the ways in which environmental movements and literary expression have tended to posit pre-ideological essences, thereby replicating patterns of power and authority. I also point to how environmentalism might be reshaped in light of poststructuralism to challenge power without reference to authority.
3. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 14 > Issue: 4
Robert Frodeman Radical Environmentalism and the Political Roots of Postmodernism
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I examine the close relationship between radical environmentalism and postmodernism. I argue that there is an incoherence within most postmodernist thought, born of an unwillingness or incapacity to distinguish between claims true from an ontological or epistemological perspective and those appropriate to the exigencies of political life. The failure to distinguish which differences make a difference not only vitiates postmodernist thought, but also runs up against some of the fundamental assumptions of radical environmentalism.
discussion papers
4. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 14 > Issue: 4
Anthony Weston Before Environmental Ethics
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Contemporary nonanthropocentic environmental ethics is profoundly shaped by the very anthropocentrism that it tries to transcend. New values only slowly struggle free of old contexts. Recognizing this struggle, however, opens a space for—indeed, necessitates—alternative models for contemporary environmental ethics. Rather than trying to unify or fine-tune our theories, we require more pluralistic andexploratory methods. We cannot reach theoretical finality; we can only co-evolve an ethic with transformed practices.
5. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 14 > Issue: 4
Christopher Manes Nature and Silence
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A viable environmental ethics must confront “the silence of nature”—the fact that in our culture only humans have status as speaking subjects. Deep ecology has attempted to do so by challenging the idiom of humanism that has silenced the natural world. This approach has been criticized by those who wish to rescue the discourse of reason in environmental ethics. I give a genealogy of nature’s silence to show how various motifs of medieval and Renaissance origins have worked together historically to create the fiction of “Man,” a character portrayed as sole subject, speaker, and telos of the world. I conclude that the discourse of reason, as a guide to social practice, is implicated in this fiction and, therefore, cannot break the silence of nature. Instead, environmental ethics must learn a language that leaps away from the motifs of humanism, perhaps by drawing on the discourse of ontological humility found in primal cultures, postmodern philosophy, and medieval contemplative tradition.
6. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 14 > Issue: 4
Christine J. Cuomo Unravelling the Problems in Ecofeminism
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Karen Warren has argued that environmental ethics must be feminist and that feminist ethics must be ecological. Hence, she endorses ecofeminism as an environmental ethic with power and promise. Recent ecofeminist theory, however, is not as powerful as one might hope. In fact, I argue, much of this theory is based on values that are potentially damaging to moral agents, and that are not in accord withfeminist goals. My intent is not to dismantle ecofeminism, but to analyze and clarify some of the philosophical problems with recent ecofeminist work and to point out a more promising direction for ecofeminist ethics.
book reviews
7. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 14 > Issue: 4
Deborah Slicer The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory
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8. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 14 > Issue: 4
Pete A. Y. Gunter Du Droit de détruire: essai sur le droit de l’environnement
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9. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 14 > Issue: 4
Dolores LaChapelle In the Absence of the Sacred: The Failure of Technology and the Survival of the Indian Nations
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comment
10. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 14 > Issue: 4
Ann S. Causey On Sport Hunting as an Instinct
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