Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Browse by:



Displaying: 1-10 of 50 documents


news and notes
1. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 25 > Issue: 4
NEWS AND NOTES
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
features
2. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 25 > Issue: 4
Jason Kawall Reverence for Life as a Viable Environmental Virtue
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
There have been several recent defenses of biocentric individualism, the position that all living beings have at least some moral standing, simply insofar as they are alive. I develop a virtue-based version of biocentric individualism, focusing on a virtue of reverence for life. In so doing, I attempt to show that such a virtuebased approach allows us to avoid common objections to biocentric individualism, based on its supposed impracticability (or, on the other hand, its emptiness).
3. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 25 > Issue: 4
Bill Hook Intrinsic Value: Under the Scrutiny of Information and Evolutionary Theory
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
We do not yet have a sound ontology for intrinsic value. Albert Borgmann’s work on information technology and Daniel Dennett’s thoughts on evolutionary theory can provide the basis for an account of intrinsic value in terms of what it is, how it comes into existence, where it is found, and whether it can be quantified or compared. Borgmann’s information and realization relations are cornerstones forunderstanding value. According to Borgmann, things are valuable when they are meaningful and things become meaningful as information and realizations. It is in these relations that intrinsic and extrinsic values find their common roots. Dennett’s musing on the relationship between DNA instructions, DNA readers, and phenotypes invites a commingling of information technology and evolutionary theory. His notion of design space provides a basis for the claim the biotic community has on intrinsic and extrinsic values.
discussion papers
4. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 25 > Issue: 4
Matthew Gowans, Philip Cafaro A Latter-Day Saint Environmental Ethic
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The doctrines and teachings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints support and even demand a strong environmental ethic. Such an ethic is grounded in the inherent value of all souls and in God’s commandment of stewardship. Latter-day Saint doctrine declares that all living organisms have souls and explicitly states that the ability of creatures to know some degree of satisfaction and happiness should be honored. God’s own concern for the well-being and progress of all life, and His sacrifice through Jesus Christ, illustrate the generous way that He expects His children to exercise their brief stewardship of this world. In addition, the important role nature has played in the religious lives of Latter-day Saint members, from the Prophet Joseph Smith to the present day, argues strongly for wilderness preservation as a spiritual resource for future generations.
5. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 25 > Issue: 4
Alexander Gillespie Legitimating a Whale Ethic
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Ethical discussions have entered into the discourse of the International Whaling Commission. In accordance with the existing approach in international environmental law, countries can legitimately choose not to exploit a resource in the traditional sense. Recognition of this possibility is important because it is commonly suggested that countries must adopt a lethal approach to so-called “sustainable whaling” as there are no other legitimate alternatives. However, the precedent of Antarctica suggests otherwise in international environmental law. Moreover, when the possibilities of the nonlethal utilization of whales via operations such as whale watching are examined, the legitimacy of the nonlethal choices is even stronger.
book reviews
6. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 25 > Issue: 4
Anthony Weston Bringing the Biosphere Home
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
7. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 25 > Issue: 4
Gary Varner Life’s Intrinsic Value
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
8. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 25 > Issue: 4
Seamus Carey An Ethics of Place: Radical Ecology, Postmodernity, and Social Theory
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
9. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 25 > Issue: 4
Cara Nine Main Currents in Western Environmental Thought
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
10. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 25 > Issue: 4
Robert Kirkman The Skeptical Environmentalist
view |  rights & permissions | cited by