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1. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
News and Notes
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features
2. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Emily Brady, Eugene C. Hargrove Announcing the Winner of the Holmes Rolston, III Early Career Essay Prize
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3. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Joakim Sandberg “My Emissions Make No Difference”: Climate Change and the Argument from Inconsequentialism
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“Since the actions I perform as an individual only have an inconsequential effect on the threat of climate change,” a common argument goes, “it cannot be morally wrong for me to take my car to work everyday or refuse to recycle.” This argument has received a lot of scorn from philosophers over the years, but has actually been defended in some recent articles. A more systematic treatment of a central set of related issues (moral mathematics, collective action, side effects, green virtues) shows how maneuvering around these issues is no easy philosophical task. In the end, it appears, the argument from inconsequentialism indeed is correct in typical cases, but there are also important qualificatory considerations.
4. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Nancy M. Rourke Prudence Gone Wild: Catholic Environmental Virtue Ethics
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A Catholic environmental virtue ethic must include an understanding of prudence that incorporates attunement significantly. Catholic theologians are reluctant to revise notions of prudence, but there are traditions in theology that support such an approach. Catholic virtue ethical traditions point to this necessity, and, in addition, philosophical environmental virtue ethics (which are much more fully developed) simply insist on it. The comparison of a moral character (as it is understood in virtue ethics) with a bioregion’s ecosystem helps support this argument.
discussion papers
5. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Kristen Hessler Agricultural Biotechnology and Environmental Justice
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Agricultural biotechnology has long been criticized from an environmental justice perspective. However, an analysis, using golden rice as a case study, shows that golden rice is not susceptible to the main criticisms that are appropriate when directed at most products of agricultural biotechnology, and that golden rice has important humanitarian potential. For these reasons, an environmental justice evaluation of golden rice may need to be more nuanced and complex than a more traditional environmental ethics can provide. Study of the complexity of this issue may pay off in a more effective environmentalism on its own terms.
6. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Kate Booth In Wilderness and Wildness: Recognizing and Responding within the Agency of Relational Memory
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There is a complexity of entities and happenings embodied within the pillars that frame the doorways in our homes and support the broad flat spaces that form supermarkets and department stores. Each pillar speaks to the mythology encircling the origins of Gothic architecture; the ideas surrounding the shift from the trunks and boughs of the sacred grove toward the columns, arches, and vaults of church and cathedral. Each pillar embodies the evolution of life and the history of the Earth. Awakening toward the relational agency at play within the “humanly derived” allows us to recognize this agency as akin to wildness and as William Cronon asserts, this kinship draws us closer to recognizing and responding to the wild in all that surrounds us. It also produces a shift in how we understand the concept of wilderness. It is not, as Cronon contends, a cultural construct, but a fluxing and complex gestalt that includes both human and more-than-human agency.
7. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Chris Klassen Nature Religion and the Ethics of Authenticity: “I Won’t Speak for All of You”
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In The Ethics of Authenticity, Charles Taylor speaks of the malaises of modernity in which individualism and authenticity lose their moral force by becoming simply a type of relativism and/or soft despotism. In contrast, Taylor suggests that individualism and authenticity need to be understood as holding moral salience through the dialogical nature of human life and the external horizons of meaning necessary to the very formulation of the authentic self. Individual choice only makes sense when some choices are more socially, politically, and/or ethically valuable than others. Taylor’s discussion of the ethics of authenticity can be applied to the religious movement of contemporary Paganism and the marked hesitation on the part of Pagans to claim any expected responsibility on the part of other Pagans toward nature and/or the environment.
8. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Robin Attfield Sober, Environmentalists, Species, and Ignorance
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In an influential paper, Elliott Sober raises philosophical problems for environmentalism, and proposes a basis for being an environmentalist without discarding familiar, traditional ethical theories, a basis consisting in the aesthetic value of nature and natural entities. Two of his themes are problematic. One is his objection to arguments from the unknown value of endangered species, which he designates “the argument from ignorance,” but which should instead be understood as arguments from probability. The other concerns his attempt to avoid holistic value theories by appealing to aesthetic value. If one invokes Derek Parfit’s response to the non-identity problem, one can appeal to another tradition-related approach that Sober neglects, which can readily be employed in support of species preservation without disparaging aesthetic value or endorsing holistic theories.
book reviews
9. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Kara M. Schlichting The Decline of Nature: Environmental History and the Western Worldview
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10. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Roger Paden From Bauhaus to Ecohouse: A History of Ecological Design
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11. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Jana Thompson A Theory of Intergenerational Justice
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12. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Dustin Mulvaney Environment and Citizenship: Integrating Justice, Responsibility, and Civic Engagement
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13. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Eric Katz Dark Green Religion: Nature Spirituality and the Planetary Future
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14. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Kelly A. Parker At Home in the World: Human Nature, Ecological Thought, and Education after Darwin
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15. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
Whitney A. Bauman Theological Foundations for Environmental Ethics: Reconstructing Patristic and Medieval Concepts
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16. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 33 > Issue: 3
David Henderson Beyond Naturalness: Rethinking Park and Wilderness Stewardship in an Era of Rapid Change
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