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1. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
News and Notes
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from the editor
2. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Eugene Hargrove Biology, Environmental Ethics, and Policy
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features
3. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Daniel Simberloff Nature, Natives, Nativism, and Management: Worldviews Underlying Controversies in Invasion Biology
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Non-native species are implicated in many ecological and economic problems, and the field of invasion biology has burgeoned in response to this fact. However, classification, terminology, and management of non-native species generate controversies and even calls for abolition of the field. The fact that the basis for disputes is differing worldviews rather than simply interpretation of biological observations suggests that resolving arguments about non-native species will be difficult, independently of questions about the operational tractability of proposed courses of action.
4. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Ricardo Rozzi Biocultural Ethics: Recovering the Vital Links between the Inhabitants, Their Habits, and Habitats
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Biocultural homogenization involves three major drivers: (a) the physical barrier to every­day contact with biodiversity derived from the rapid growth of urban population, (b) the conceptual barrier derived from the omission in formal and non-formal education of native languages that contain a broad spectrum of traditional ecological knowledge and values, and (c) political barriers associated with the elimination or reduction of the teaching of ethics under the prevailing neoliberal economy governance since the 1960s. Biocultural ethics aims at overcoming these barriers by recovering the vital links between biological and cultural diversity, between the habits and the habitats of the inhabitants. These links are acknowledged by early Western philosophy, Amerindian traditional ecological knowledge, and contemporary ecological and evolutionary sciences, but have been lost in prevailing modern ethics. There is an overlooked diversity of forms of knowing and inhabiting regional ecosystems, each of them having diverse environmental and social consequences. A better understanding of the regionally diverse mosaics of ecosystems, languages, and cultures facilitates the distinction of specific causes and responsible agents of environmental problems, and the disclosure of sustainable practices, forms of ecological knowledge and values that offer already existing options to solve socio-ecological problems.
5. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Christian Diehm Biophilia and Biodiversity: Environmental Ethics in the Work of Stephen R. Kellert
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Although Stephen R. Kellert critiques both nonanthropocentric and narrowly anthropocentric approaches to environmental ethics, and proposes instead a broadly anthropocentric position that relies on a distinctive version of the biophilia hypothesis, his portrayal of his position as anthropocentric exposes his work to some common criticisms of human-centered views. However, the version of the biophilia hypothesis that Kellert advocates actually supports a nonanthropocentric environmental ethic, and his example of a shift in public attitudes toward marine mammals can be used to demonstrate how his position would benefit from affirming the noninstrumentalist attitudes that are implicit within it.
6. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Eric Katz Further Adventures in the Case against Restoration
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Ecological restoration has been a topic for philosophical criticism for three decades. In this essay, I present a discussion of the arguments against ecological restoration and the objections raised against my position. I have two purposes in mind: (1) to defend my views against my critics, and (2) to demonstrate that the debate over restoration reveals fundamental ideas about the meaning of nature, ideas that are necessary for the existence of any substantive environmentalism. I discuss the possibility of positive restorations, the idea that nature can restore itself, the meaning of artifacts, and the significance of the distinction between humanity and nature.
book reviews
7. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Ronnie Hawkins Metamorphoses of the Zoo: Animal Encounters after Noah
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8. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Serpil Oppermann Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self
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9. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Li An Phoa Cultivating an Ecological Conscience: Essays from a Farmer Philosopher
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10. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
David K. Goodin The Tangled Bank: Toward an Ecotheological Ethics of Responsible Participation
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