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Essays in Philosophy

Volume 3, Issue 2, June 2002
Pragmatism and Neopragmatism

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Displaying: 1-16 of 16 documents


editor’s introduction
1. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
David Boersema Introduction: Pragmatism and Neopragmatism
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essays
2. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Heidi Salaverria Who is Exaggerating? The Mystery of Common Sense
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3. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Charbel Niño El-Hani, Sami Pihlström Emergence Theories and Pragmatic Realism
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The tradition of pragmatism has, especially since Dewey, been characterized by a commitment to nonreductive naturalism. The notion of emergence, popular in the early decades of the twentieth century and currently re-emerging as a central concept in metaphysics and the philosophy of mind, may be useful in explicating that commitment. The present paper discusses the issue of the reality of emergent properties, drawing particular attention to a pragmatic way of approaching this issue. The reality of emergents can be defended as a pragmatically-useful ontological commitment; hence, pragmatism can be employed as a tool in the debate over the structure and reality of emergence. This strategy of justifying ontological commitments is examined through historical and systematic discussions of the pragmatist tradition. It turns out, among other things, that while classical pragmatists did not specify any technical notion of emergence in the contemporary sense, their non-reductively naturalist views are relevant to the more recent emergence discussions -- especially because they rejected the metaphysical realism typical of today’s ontologically-oriented emergence theories.
4. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Hendrik R. Pieterse Neopragmatism and the Christian Desire for a Transcendent God: Is a Meaningful Dialogue Possible?
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5. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Mark McEvoy Naturalized Epistemology, Normativity and the Argument Against the A Priori
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6. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Gregory M. Fahey The Idea of the Good in John Dewey and Aristotle
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7. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Kevin Decker Habermas on Human Rights and Cloning: A Pragmatist Response
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8. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
D. S. Clark Pragmatism’s Instrumental View of Moral Reasoning
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9. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Brian E. Butler Legal Pragmatism: Banal or Beneficial as a Jurisprudential Position?
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book reviews
10. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Steven Schroeder Review of Kierkegaard After MacIntyre: Essays on Freedom, Narrative, and Virtue, ed. John J. Davenport and Anthony Rudd
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11. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Elizabeth Millán-Zaibert Review of Kant Trouble: The Obscurities of the Enlightened, by Diane Morgan
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12. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Clancy W. Martin Review of Philosophy and Tragedy, ed. Miguel de Beistegui and Simon Sparks
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13. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Leo Zaibert Review of Hannah Arendt in Jerusalem, ed. Steven E. Aschheim
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14. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Lawrence Udell Fike Jr. Review of The Sage and the Second Sex: Confucianism, Ethics, and Gender, ed. Chenyang Li
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15. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Zsolt Bátori Review of Having Thought, by John Haugeland
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16. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Susan Armstrong Review of Utopias, Dolphins and Computers: Problems of Philosophical Plumbing, by Mary Midgley
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