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Displaying: 1-7 of 7 documents


1. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Wacław Sadkowski Open Minds Against Closed Societies: A Key for Understanding of Post WWII Central and East European History
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2. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Gary M. Hamburg Closed Societies, Open Minds: Andrzej Walicki, Isaiah Berlin and the Writing of Russian History During the Cold War
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This article compares the thinking of Andrzej Walicki and Isaiah Berlin on the nineteenth-century Russian intelligentsia and on Soviet totalitarianism. It suggests that Berlin saw totalitarianism as an externally imposed political system, whereas Walicki understood totalitarianism to depend both on external pressure and inner coercion. The article draws on a variety of published and unpublished sources, including personal interviews with Walicki and Berlin’s archives at the New Bodleian Library in Oxford, England.
3. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Randall A. Poole Isaiah Berlin and Andrzej Walicki as Intellectual Historians and Liberal Philosophers: A Comment on G. M. Hamburg’s “Closed Societies, Open Minds”
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This essay is a brief comparison of Isaiah Berlin and Andrzej Walicki as intellectual historians and liberal philosophers, written in response to G. M. Hamburg’s major essay, “Closed Societies, Open Minds”.
4. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Randall A. Poole Sergei Kotliarevskii and the Rule of Law in Russian Liberal Theory
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This essay is an explication and analysis of the work of Sergei Kotliarevskii, a major Russian liberal theorist, focusing on his 1915 treatise Vlast’ i pravo. Problema pravovogo gosudarstva (Power and Law: The Problem of the Lawful State). Although the “lawful state” has long been a subject of interest and controversy (even at the definitional level) among historians and political scientists, curiously Kotliarevskii has not received the attention he deserves. His study of the concept of the lawful state, which for him was integrally related to the ideal of the rule of law, is an important Russian contribution to the history and philosophy of law and the state. This essay explores the philosophical sources and contexts of his work; his understanding of the relationship among power, law, and thestate; his thesis that religious ideas and institutions were most important in the historical development of legal consciousness; his consideration of the modern constitutional state; and his conviction that personhood—the absolute value and dignity of the human person—was the ultimate justification for the rule of law.
5. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Piotr Wandycz Nationalism and Patriotism: The Contribution of Andrzej Walicki
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This article surveys briefly the main concepts of the nation and nationalism, and notes the wide range of interpretations. A distinction is drawn between Liberal and integral nationalism, the use of the Polish term nacjonalizm, and the alleged basic difference between nationalism in Western and Eastern Europe.The second part of this article is devoted to Walicki’s theses and contributions. They are characterized by a rejection of the concept of the artificiality of the nation, of “constructivism” and the “imagined community” model. He does it not only on purely theoretical grounds but on the basis of an examination of the origins and development of Polish nationalism and patriotism which the above-cited writers have ignored. He concludes that only a profound knowledge of Polish history—sadly lacking in Western literature—would permit a more nuanced presentation of the general phenomena of nation and nationalism in Europe.
6. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Ideas and Power in Modern Europe. A Conference in Honor of Andrzej Walicki January 20–21, 2006
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7. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Our Contributors
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