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Dialogue and Universalism

Comprehensiveness, Dialogue, Integration, Open Synthesis, Wisdom

Volume 16, Issue 5/6, 2006
Authentic University

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Displaying: 1-10 of 21 documents


1. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 5/6
Małgorzata Czarnocka Towards the Comprehension of the Present. Elements of Contemporary Intellectual Worldview Structure
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diversity of spirituality
2. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 5/6
Werner Krieglstein The Truth Beneath the Skin. A Foundation for a Secular Spirituality
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In this paper the author explores possibilities for experiential truth-finding as a response to the Kantian impasse. Finding truth not as a result of logical abstraction but as a living experience is placed into its historic context, tracing it back to ancient practices that were revived and lived on in many forms of mysticism, old and new. It is shown how Hegelian philosophy was influenced by Judaic Cabalism and how Hegel’s living dialectic as a way to reach truth experientially in art lived on in Nietzsche’s philosophy and found its way into the neo-Marxist philosophy of the Frankfurt School. The author draws from his personal experience as Adorno’s student, as an actor, theater director, organic farmer, and father of five children.
3. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 5/6
Maryann Krieglstein Spirituality and Social Work
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In discussing social work and spirituality this paper will: list social work’s core values, language, and personal qualities that connect to spirituality; give a brief historical perspective that has led to social work’s struggle with the concepts of “religion” and “spirituality”; explain the present position of social work toward religion and spirituality and examine some of the controversies; present some current definitions of “religion” and “spirituality”; define different types of spirituality; and end with the concept of “relational spirituality” and its connection to social work.
4. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 5/6
Beata Elwich, Ella Chmielewska The Icon: Spirituality and Philosophy
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5. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 5/6
Ewa Paśnik A Report From Interdisciplinary Course: Philosophy, Science and Spirituality
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transformation of marxism
6. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 5/6
Kevin M. Brien Humanistic Marxism and the Transformation of Reason
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This paper will open with a focus on alienated and unfree activity as it is presented by Marx in his famous Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844. My concern will be to bring out the most central dimensions of his view of such activity including: the alienated relation in such activity to other people, to one’s own activity, to the products of one’s activity, to the natural world, etc. Moreover, I will be especially concerned to bring out the mode of reason that is embedded within alienated activity, as well as the kind of relation between cognition, conation, sensory experience, feeling, (etc.) that Marx projects as obtaining in such activity. Following this I will make a dialectical extrapolation from the analysis of alienated activity that Marx gives us, and go on to present a sketch of a humanistic-Marxist interpretation of unalienated and free activity. This will be seen to involve not only a very different structural relation to other people, to one’s own activity, and to the natural world than the one that obtains in alienated activity—but also a very different structural relation between cognition, conation, sensoryexperience, feeling, (etc.). Then I will give a sketch of a praxis-oriented interpretation of historical materialism, which will serve to bring out the historicity of reason, and the historicity of the modes of rationality that prevail at various stages in world history. The last section of this paper will argue: (1) that a transformation of reason is a real possibility; (2) that a transformation of reason in the direction of the kind of unalienated and free activity I have delineated earlier offers the best hope for a human future and a sustainable relation to the natural world; and also (3) that at this juncture in human history it has now become a practical necessity, if humankind is to lift itself out of the mounting world crisis—spiritual and otherwise—in which we are all enmeshed.
7. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 5/6
Stephanie Theodoru Alienated Labor: Comments on Kevin Brien on Marx’s Notion
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8. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 5/6
Halina Walentowicz Max Horkheimer and His Philosophy
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The author advances the thesis that Max Horkheimer’s philosophy is a social one, the constitutive element of which is historiosophy. Contrary to the interpretative stereotype, dominating the philosophical literature, the Author strives to prove that Max Horkheimer’s philosophical point of view—that he calls the critical theory—is distinguished by its uniformity, because albeit the critical theory evaluated under the influence of the 20th-century Europe turbulent history, left its identity intact. The Author thinks that the identity of the critical theory has two major indicators: 1. a visible criticism of the founding father of the Frankfurt philosophical school throughout his intellectual development towards the socio-historical circumstances that deprives the intellectual unity of autonomy and suppresses an independent thought and 2. the inconsolable thirst of changing things into better ones. Three stages of the development of Horkheimer’s philosophical conception have been depicted and briefly characterized in the article: prewar (the forming of the evidence of the critical theory), wartime (thehistoriosophical conception depicting the auto destruction of enlightenment) and postwar (the prediction of “an administered world”).
study of wisdom
9. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 5/6
Stanisław Kowalczyk Topicality of St. Augustine’s Concept of Wisdom
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St. Augustine’s idea of wisdom partly studied by H. I. Marrou, F. Cayré, J. Maritain and E. Gilson, is more universal than Aristotle’s or Thomas Aquinas’. For the Bishop of Hippo the term sapientia can designate, on the supernatural plane, God’s nature, the life of grace, contemplation of God, and, on the natural plane, contemplation of truth or even man’s ethical life.The purpose of this paper is to examine in what relationship theoretical wisdom, which Augustine identifies with philosophy, and learning stand to each other. Wisdom is a universal and genetic knowledge of the world, while learning is the knowledge of the particular and phenomenon. The object of wisdom is the world of the spirit that of learning is the material world. Wisdom and learning, even though they may be opposed, do not exclude one another. Their development precisely depends on their mutual harmonious cooperation, but sapiential knowledge keeping the guiding role.
next step in the philosophy of dialogue?
10. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 16 > Issue: 5/6
Józef Baniak The Poznań “School” of Dialogic Thinking
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