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Dialogue and Universalism

Volume 23, Issue 4, 2013
Henryk Skolimowski’s Eco-Philosophy

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1. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Małgorzata Czarnocka Editorial
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henryk skolimowski’s eco-philosophy
2. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Henryk Skolimowski Henryk Skolimowski’s Papers
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In his five texts Henryk Skolimowski concisely presents his philosophical views, also in the processes of their emerging and transforming. He gives an account of all the phases of his philosophical accomplishments—from the initial version of ecophilosophy to the latest conception of lumenology which is a metaphysical grounding of eco-philosophy. Henryk Skolimowski shows how the emergence of his philosophical ideas was conditioned by the contemporary state of the world, by his own personal life’s experiences, and how they challenge the 20th-century philosophy (first if all analytical movement) and its faulty goals.
3. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Henryk Skolimowski Preamble: Why Must We Change?
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4. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Henryk Skolimowski My Philosophical Legacy
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5. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Henryk Skolimowski Encounters with Light
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6. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Henryk Skolimowski Dialogues on Light and Lumenarchy
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7. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Henryk Skolimowski Epilogue: Philosophy Is Immortal
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8. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Bibliography
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9. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Vir Singh Henryk Skolimowski’s Philosophical Revolution
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According to the author of the paper, philosophy serves to nurture civilizations by nurturing human values. It must evoke human consciousness and initiate a revolution indispensable for an ever evolving, creative, vibrant, and sustainable civilization. For the author, philosophy’s first and the foremost attribute should be the sustaining and enhancement of life. The author claims that such philosophy is desperately needed in our world gradually losing grounds for life. In author’s opinion, Henryk Skolimowski’s eco-philosophy sparks a revolution for healing the self, the planet, restoring the ecological balance, and constructing a new reality. Ecological consciousness, eco-ethics, ecojustice, eco-yoga, eco-dharma, etc. are valuable attributes of eco-philosophy conferred on our present civilization. Skolimowski’s philosophy unfolds the potencies of the mind and serves to educate it. It brings out all the elements of human glory and glorifies humans who are in his view custodians of life and of the whole cosmos. He infuses in them a superb sense of responsibility for Earth. Skolimowski’s philosophy reveals creativedimensions of the cosmic light. It attempts to cosmologise human beings.
10. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
David Skrbina Ethics, Eco-Philosophy, and Universal Sympathy
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Unlike conventional ethical theory, environmental ethics—and eco-philosophy generally—have frequently been able to escape the desiccating rigors of analytical thinking. This is due in large part to the nonconforming and creative work of people like Henryk Skolimowski, whose ideas have influenced the philosophical dialogue for nearly 40 years now. The guiding principle of his new worldview, that the world is a sanctuary and not a machine, implies a radically expanded conception of eco-ethics. And his metaphysical stance of noetic monism demands that mind and reality be taken together, as a unit. These ideas fit well with the recent trend in philosophy of mind toward panexperientialist ontologies. Collectively, such notions point toward the concept of universal intrinsic value in nature, and a concomitant form of ethics that I call “universal sympathy.”
11. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Włodzimierz Tyburski Henryk Skolimowski on Ecological Culture
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Henryk Skolimowski pays particular attention to the problem of ecological culture. He is convinced that only societies characterized by ecological culture are able to cope successfully with the most difficult problem of modernity which is the issue of the environment. The necessary condition for building man’s ecological culture, aside from equipping him with ecological knowledge as well as a system of values along with their normative equivalents, consists in shaping the pro-ecological attitude which manifests itself in particular actions. The objective of the article is to present Skolimowski’s ideas on the essence of ecological culture and on the necessary actions to be undertaken to shape thinking, axiology, individual and social behavior in its light.
12. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Zbigniew Wróblewski An Outline of the Methodological Characteristic of Henryk Skolimowski’s Eco-Philosophy
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The article presents the typological and conceptual tools used by Henryk Skolimowski to describe and explain the relation between man and nature. Skolimowski claims that the main determinant of this relation is the way man sees nature, i.e., the vision of nature which prevails in his culture and times. In other words, decisive for our relation to nature is cosmology (the cosmological model and the view of nature). The first part of the article outlines the fundamental functions of the cosmological model (the central cosmology category) which are (i) to interpret daily and scientific experiences, (ii) to establish the type of actions which relate to man and nature. The second part concerns the structure of worldview which is based on a cosmological model. The structure of worldview embraces a cosmological model presenting the general structure of nature, eschatology understood as a realm of human life and cosmic goal, and ethicsdetermining human behaviour.
13. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Ignacy S. Fiut The Idea of Sustainable Development in Henryk Skolimowski’s Eco-Philosophy
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The paper analyses the meaning and implementation of the notion of sustainable development from the viewpoint of Henryk Skolimowski’s eco-philosophy. Skolimowski formulates a radical criticism of the Western civilisation with its dominating forms of rationality and the resulting technological implementations. In his opinion, this system is a source of imbalance both in the nature and social life of people in the global scale, which results in various types of civilizational crises. We will particularly pay attention to the theoretical proposals formulated by Skolimowski in his The Genius of Light and Sacredness of Life. In this work he refers to Pierre Teilhard de Chardin’s vision of evolutionary philosophy, enriched with his own original philosophical ideas. Skolimowski particularly emphasises the emergence of the photosynthesis phenomenon, and subsequently logo- and theo-synthesis in evolution process. He claims that these are the forms of light condensation whose laws of development control our planet as well as the whole cosmos. The human species participates in this process taking part in the evolutionarily developing possibilities of transcendence and self-realisation. As Skolimowski suggests, the process of self-realisation and transcending should manifest the character of the conscious self-limitation of man in his relations and interactions with nature and society. The idea of cosmic ethics, of imperative character, developed by him is to serve this purpose.
14. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Andrzej Kiepas Eco-Philosophy and the Rationality of Science and Technology. Henryk Skolimowski’s Criticism of Technological Civilization
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The article presents Henryk Skolimowski’s standpoint on the civilizational role of technology in the context of his eco-philosophy concept, it also reviews the changes underway in science and technology and the challenges posed on their rationality. Despite its evident historical anchoring, Skolimowski’s position appears to contain many currently important ideas and solutions.
15. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Krystyna Najder-Stefaniak The Value of Beauty in the Perspective of Eco-Systemic Thinking
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The article refers to the fact that the eco-systemic paradigm of thinking gives new possibilities to understand and evaluate beauty. The paper analyzes the understanding of beauty proposed by a founder of eco-philosophy, Henryk Skolimowski. Moreover, it refers to the conceptions of the relationship between beauty and creative human activity in the writings of Plotinus, Henri Bergson, and Edward Abramowski. Inspired by their reflections on beauty, the paper presents author’s own justification of the value of beauty obeyed the paradigm of eco-systemic thinking.
16. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Lokesh Chandra The Universe of Henryk Skolimowski
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In the paper it is shown that Henryk Skolimowski’s eco-philosophy is a special one. It differs from secular ecologies, being a united insight in life, nature, and values. It is also shown that Skolimowski’s conception is in a close relation both with ancient Greeks religion beliefs and with the Indian metaphysical-religious worldviews.
the isud meeting, athens 2013
17. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Hope Fitz A Comparison of Ancient Greek and Ancient Indian Philosophy by Comparative Philosophers Is Necessary for the Understanding of the Roots of Philosophical Thought
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In this paper, I give examples of the similarities in thought which I have found in the works of philosophers and thinkers of ancient Greece and ancient India. Being a comparative philosopher, I have worked with both traditions for many years. In fact, the more I do research in both traditions, the more similarities I have found in various views or perspectives, beliefs and values.After briefly explaining some of the similarities, I argue that an ongoing exploration and comparison of these two great traditions can help humans to understand the origins of knowledge, especially philosophical knowledge, and that because the study involves both Western and non-Western traditions, it will require comparative philosophers to undertake the study. Furthermore, since the study will involve research concerning the two cultures, anthropologists, linguists, and some historians will also be needed in this undertaking.
18. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Christopher Vasillopulos The Iliad. The First Political Theory
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Achilles’ dissatisfaction with the heroic code, despite his preeminence, is Homer’s platform on which he demonstrates that the code is an inadequate basis for the emerging polis. The political requires a new kind of man, one capable of love and friendship. For only this kind of man can be a proper citizen, a person capable of more than adherence to a heroic code.
19. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Panos Eliopoulos The Anti-Plato of Charles Baudelaire
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In Charles Baudelaire’s poetry there is only one direct reference to Plato. The French poet juxtaposes the joy of the senses to the ascetic, as he perceives it, pursuit of the Platonic Good. This juxtaposition is taking place not only with the aid of ethical terms, but principally through their transformation into aesthetic ones. For Baudelaire, the absence of the metaphysical or symbolical light is tautological to beauty, but also a firm ground where the poet stands upon for his artistic creation. Human existence without light, although bordering to the cold safety of death, is also an affirmation of its emptiness when without pleasure and passion.
20. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Lilian Karali Culture and Universal Dialogue
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The paper considers the importance of culture for achieving universal dialogue. It clarifies the meanings of the terms “culture” and “art”, focusing on their historical transformations, and on the historical development of the history of art and archaeology, two academic disciplines which investigate art and culture. The recognition of the meanings is treated here as a basic initiating and necessary step in investigating intercultural (universal) dialogue.