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Dialogue and Universalism

Volume 23, Issue 4, 2013
Henryk Skolimowski’s Eco-Philosophy

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Displaying: 1-10 of 21 documents


1. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Małgorzata Czarnocka Editorial
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henryk skolimowski’s eco-philosophy
2. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Henryk Skolimowski Henryk Skolimowski’s Papers
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In his five texts Henryk Skolimowski concisely presents his philosophical views, also in the processes of their emerging and transforming. He gives an account of all the phases of his philosophical accomplishments—from the initial version of ecophilosophy to the latest conception of lumenology which is a metaphysical grounding of eco-philosophy. Henryk Skolimowski shows how the emergence of his philosophical ideas was conditioned by the contemporary state of the world, by his own personal life’s experiences, and how they challenge the 20th-century philosophy (first if all analytical movement) and its faulty goals.
3. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Henryk Skolimowski Preamble: Why Must We Change?
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4. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Henryk Skolimowski My Philosophical Legacy
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5. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Henryk Skolimowski Encounters with Light
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6. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Henryk Skolimowski Dialogues on Light and Lumenarchy
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7. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Henryk Skolimowski Epilogue: Philosophy Is Immortal
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8. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Bibliography
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9. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
Vir Singh Henryk Skolimowski’s Philosophical Revolution
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According to the author of the paper, philosophy serves to nurture civilizations by nurturing human values. It must evoke human consciousness and initiate a revolution indispensable for an ever evolving, creative, vibrant, and sustainable civilization. For the author, philosophy’s first and the foremost attribute should be the sustaining and enhancement of life. The author claims that such philosophy is desperately needed in our world gradually losing grounds for life. In author’s opinion, Henryk Skolimowski’s eco-philosophy sparks a revolution for healing the self, the planet, restoring the ecological balance, and constructing a new reality. Ecological consciousness, eco-ethics, ecojustice, eco-yoga, eco-dharma, etc. are valuable attributes of eco-philosophy conferred on our present civilization. Skolimowski’s philosophy unfolds the potencies of the mind and serves to educate it. It brings out all the elements of human glory and glorifies humans who are in his view custodians of life and of the whole cosmos. He infuses in them a superb sense of responsibility for Earth. Skolimowski’s philosophy reveals creativedimensions of the cosmic light. It attempts to cosmologise human beings.
10. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 23 > Issue: 4
David Skrbina Ethics, Eco-Philosophy, and Universal Sympathy
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Unlike conventional ethical theory, environmental ethics—and eco-philosophy generally—have frequently been able to escape the desiccating rigors of analytical thinking. This is due in large part to the nonconforming and creative work of people like Henryk Skolimowski, whose ideas have influenced the philosophical dialogue for nearly 40 years now. The guiding principle of his new worldview, that the world is a sanctuary and not a machine, implies a radically expanded conception of eco-ethics. And his metaphysical stance of noetic monism demands that mind and reality be taken together, as a unit. These ideas fit well with the recent trend in philosophy of mind toward panexperientialist ontologies. Collectively, such notions point toward the concept of universal intrinsic value in nature, and a concomitant form of ethics that I call “universal sympathy.”