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Dialogue and Universalism

Volume 24, Issue 3, 2014
Philosophy: In Search for Knowledge and Ways of Life

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Displaying: 1-10 of 35 documents


editors’ note
1. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Małgorzata Czarnocka Philosophy: In Search for Knowledge and Ways of Life (1)
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editorial
2. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Emiliya Tajsina Philosophy: In Search for Knowledge and Ways of Life (2)
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ways of philosophy
3. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Marc Lucht Philosophy as a Way of Living
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Oriented by the philosophical work of Kant and Heidegger, this paper reflects upon some of the ways in which philosophy can inform every day living. First briefly sketching some of the connections between philosophical practice and the cultivation of autonomy, critical rationality, personal responsibility, and attitudes conducive of peace, this paper then turns to the capacity for philosophical contemplation to enrich a life by cultivating sensitivity and attentiveness to meaning and inherent worth.
4. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Vladimir Przhilenskiy Suspicion and Method: Towards the Post-Theoretical Lifeworld
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The article analyzes the historical and philosophical roots of the art of suspicion and its role in the development of modern philosophy and its method. Particular attention is paid to the issues of the comparison of philosophical suspicion and conspiracy theories as a special state of mass consciousness. The article also specifies the dependence of the art of suspicion on the sociology of knowledge and post-theoretical thinking.
5. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Panos Eliopoulos The Stoic Cosmopolitanism as a Way of Life
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The word cosmopolitanism is derived from “cosmos” (universe) and “polites” (citizen). The cosmopolite is a citizen of the world. The Stoics elaborate on the theme, using the ideas of oikeiosis and sympathy as its basis, thus drawing from their physics. Particularly, Epictetus defends cosmopolitanism on the assumption that man is akin to God, whereas Marcus Aurelius highlights the common possession of mind (νοῦς) and that man is by nature able for communal life. For the Stoics man is a social being who can be perfected only within the society of other human beings. The brotherhood of men is grounded on the indubitable axiom that the human soul is the source of the unique good, which is virtue. The distinctive parameter for creating a community is virtue, which is an objective for everyone but also an inherent and ecumenical capacity.
6. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
German V. Melikhov On the Unrestraint in Beliefs
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This article studies the unrestraint in beliefs associated with the overemphasizing of our beliefs. The author argues that the intolerance for other points of view appears (among other factors) because of a naively-objectivist understanding of philosophy, one which is based on two assumptions: first, philosophy is considered only as a theory and not an individual practice, not an experience, and second, the truth is considered as identical to a certain ideal-objective content that can be in one’s possession.There are true ideas and proper words. If we learn these ideas, we will definitely seize the truth. The author opposes this understanding the notion of philosophy which is based on the experience of the encounter and upon reflexive comprehension of this experience. It is possible to minimize unrestraint in beliefs if we assume that all the points of view including our own are considered as belonging to the incomprehensible Absolute.
7. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Tatiana M. Shatunova Aesthetics as Metaphysics and Passion
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Philosophy is an inquiry and way of life. Is it possible to apply this formula to aesthetics? There is no doubt that aesthetics is always an investigation, a questioning. However, is it possible to speak about aesthetics as a way of life, too? To answer this question, it is necessary to understand what happens in aesthetic theory today, or rather, what is contemporary aesthetics of today.
8. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Igor Gasparov Spiritual Exercises as an Essential Part of Philosophical Life
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In my paper I will argue for the thesis that spiritual exercises are an essential part of every philosophical life. My arguments are partly historical, partly conceptual in their nature. First, I show that philosophy at each stage of its history was accompanied by spiritual exercises. Next, I provide a definition of spiritual exercises as genuinely philosophical activity. Then I show that the philosophical life cannot be complete if it does not include spiritual exercises.
9. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Elena N. Bolotnikova Philosophy as Self-Care
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This article states that the search for the meaning of life is possible only through an address to non-existence, and it is a sign of genuine human self-care. Religion and philosophy are considered as incarnation of the space of care. Philosophy here is understood in a broad sense, not as a rigorous science, but as search for wisdom. Based on the structure of self-care, given in Michel Foucault’s works, here are revealed peculiarities of the search for the meaning of life in respective fields. This also implies different lifestyles. The author believes that genuine self-care is available to everyone, in spite of the nature of modern mass culture.
philosophy on being
10. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Aleksey N. Fatenkov Realistic Strategy in Comprehending Being
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The article deals with the category of sense. It examines the meaningfulness of the absurd and takes realism to be a basic strategy in comprehending being. This strategy is compared with constructivism and reflection, or correspondence (copy) theory.