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Dialogue and Universalism

Volume 27, Issue 2, 2017
Values and Ideals. Theory and Practice: Part III

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in memoriam janusz kuczyński
1. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Charles Brown, Jean Campbell In Memoriam: Janusz Kuczyński
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2. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Rev. Mother Marie Pauline Eboh The Exit of a Philosophical Icon: Janusz Kuczyński
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3. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Józef Leszek Krakowiak Janusz Kuczyński, A Man of Dialogue
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4. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Michael Mitias, John Rensenbrink, Andrew Targowski Janusz Kuczyński: The Philosopher I Knew
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editorial
5. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Małgorzata Czarnocka Editorial: Values and Ideals. Theory and Practice, Part III
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philosophical ideals for a more decent world
6. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Juichiro Tanabe Buddhist Philosophy of the Global Mind for Sustainable Peace
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While violence and conflict are the main problems that must be tackled for a peaceful world, they are caused and sustained through our own thoughts. Though external causes must not be ignored, the most fundamental problem is an epistemological one—our way of knowing and understanding the world. Since its beginning, Buddhism has deepened its analysis of the dynamics of the human mind, both as a root cause of suffering and as a source of harmony. This paper explores how Buddhism's analysis of the human mind can be applied to conflict dynamics, conflict resolution, and building a sustainable peace.
7. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Hisaki Hashi The Values of “Contradiction” in Theory and Practice in Cultural Philosophy
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This article examines contradictions between the theory and practice of comparative philosophy in a global world. Aristotle and Plato had different approaches to these “contradictions” that show a “discrepancy” between these two classical thinkers. The topic unaddressed by Plato is taken up in the topos of Nāgārjuna, the great ancient logician of ontology in Mahāyāna Buddhist philosophy (the 3rd century AD). The “contradiction” is a principle that have/had profound influence on creative thought in East Asia. Nishida, the founder of the Kyoto School (20th century), established his philosophy through the principle of “Absolute Contradictory Self-Identity.” This principle may stimulate reflection upon our digitally connected contemporary global world, and the chaos it has to face.
8. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Yuliya Shcherbina Participative Reason as a Basis of a Decent Human World
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Mikhail Bakhtin’s term “participative reason” (uchastnoe myshlenie) means “reason that acts”—a way of thinking in which a person participates because it is not indifferent to the fate of the Other. The article considers two main trends in the understanding of participative reason. The first is connected with the co-being of I and the Other, the second develops the idea of obligation and non-alibi in being. The article aims to show that the unity of these two interpretations could make “participative reason” a basis for a more decent human world.
cultures — their ideals and values
9. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Evgeniy Bubnov Methodological Ludism as a Cognition-Denying Paradigm
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The article attempts to analyze methodological ludism—an approach developed by André Droogers, a Dutch scholar studying religion. Droogers relies on Johan Huizinga’s conception claiming that culture (and, consequently, science) is of game-like nature. Game as a methodological principle has two levels: noumenal and phenomenal. The supposition is stated that at the noumenal level (the designatum level) ludism coincides with pantheism. At the phenomenal level (the signifier level) methodological ludism may be compared with its parts: methodological atheism, methodological agnosticism, and methodological theism; also, these components may be compared with one another.
10. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Olatunji Alabi Oyeshile Democratic Elements in Traditional Yoruba Society as a Basis for the Culture of Democracy in Africa and the Global Social Order
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The paper examines democratic concepts or elements in traditional Yoruba society and their implications for the culture of democracy in Africa and the social order at the global level. One of the major problems confronting African states is the problem of governance. Political crises have metamorphosed into problems of ethnic conflict, war, corruption, economic stagnation, social disorder and paucity of sustainable development in Africa and these crises have also resulted in global disequilibrium. This paper revisits traditional Yoruba society, with a special emphasis on the democratic elements. It adopts as its theoretical framework some aspects of the traditional Yoruba socio-ethical values to underscore the importance of democratic elements based on communal values. Such concepts as ifowosowopo (cooperation), agbajo owo (solidarity), amumora (tolerance), and ilosiwaju (progress) are examined to point up their roles in addressing the crisis of (democratic) governance. The paper establishes that the inbuilt democratic elements, based on social ethical values, helped to sustain governance in traditional Yoruba society. It is concluded that democratic elements are much more important than democracy itself.