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1. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Ryan J. Barilleaux Message from the Editor-In-Chief
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2. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Rev. Robert J. Batule In Memorium: John Cardinal O'Connor (1920-2000)
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part i - symposia: the social thought of john paul ii
3. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Kenneth L. Grasso Introduction
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4. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Francis Cardinal George The Anthropological Foundations of John Paul II's Social Thought
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The social thought of John Paul II is deeply normative in its orientation, and seeks to find a grounding for moral human action in philosophy as well asfaith. The key to the Pope's ideas about human action is his anthropology, which focuses on three central issues: the intrinsic dignity of the human person; the human telos or destiny in self-giving to others; and, the reality of human sinfulness.
5. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Kenneth L. Schmitz A Not Uncritical Harmony
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John Paul II's encyclical Fides et Ratio reiterates in a new and fresh way the harmony of faith and reason. The dominant tradition of Catholic thought isone that sees this harmony, but the tradition is not uncritical. Throughout the history of the Church, there have been thinkers wary of reason. The thoughtof Karol Wojtyla, both before and during his papacy, has looked to a focus on the human person as a way to reconcile faith and reason.
6. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Kenneth L. Grasso John Paul II on Modernity, the Moral Structure of Freedom and the Future of the Free Society
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John Paul II neither rejects modernity nor exalts the freedom it has engendered. Rather, he affirms the modem aspiration to achieve "the completeliberation of man," but does so in terms of "the complete truth about the human being" and "the truth and love revealed to men by Jesus Christ."
7. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Patricia Donohue-White The "Feminist Pope"? Women and the Family in the Social Thought of John Paul II
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The thought of John Paul II on women and the family is consistent with the tradition of relational feminism. Often overlooked in discussions of his thinking are themes that reflect this tradition: participation of women in public life; affirmation of the distinctive capacities and contributions of women; interdependence and solidarity of men and women; and, the need for social and economic practices that will enable women and men to participate in public life while protecting and promoting the good of families.
8. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Jean Bethke Elshtain Pope John Paul II's Social Thought: Beyond Politics Or Ideology
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Jolm Paul II has consistently addressed a set of core themes in his writing and preaching: a dialectic oflaw and grace; the irreducible dignity of the humanperson; and, the interweaving of freedom and responsibility. The Pope's thought is often misunderstood and misrepresented by those who are determined to force his ideas into standard political or ideological categories. His ethics are neither capitalist nor Marxist: they are Catholic and social.
part i - symposia: america, modernity and the culture of death
9. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Gary D. Glenn Introduction
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The essays in this symposium address the relationship between America's founding principles and what Pope John Paul II has called the "culture ofdeath" that pervades Western democracies. The articles are written by American Catholics who possess a deep love for their faith and their country, and who are willing to point out the defects of their beloved homeland as these faults have been exposed by faithful reflection and scholarship.
10. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Kimberly Shankman Natural Law Constitutionalism and the Culture of Death
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Would the use of natural law principles in constitutional adjudication be effective in overturning the "death decisions" of the United States Supreme Court? This article argues that a natural-law oriented jurisprudence is not only consistent with, but is inherent in, a full intent-of-the-framers approach to constitutional interpretation.
11. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
John Stack Alexander Hamilton, Montesquieu, and the Humanity of the Modern Commercial Republic
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Alexander Hamilton's vision of a commerical republic ameliorates some of the harsh iniquities of antiquity's martial republics, so is more conducive to a culture of life than were the ancient republics. Hamilton believed that a commercial republic could and would be built on virtuous citizens; the contemporary American republic has many benefits, but does not live up to Hamilton's hopes and expectations. One central problem in modem America is rampant avarice, a vice that Hamilton found dangerous and discouraged.
12. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Carson L. Holloway Evangelium Vitae and Modernity: The Philosophical Origins of the Culture of Death
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This article argues that the "culture of death" identified in the papal encyclical Evangelium Vitae is deeply rooted in the structure and principles of modernity.The foundational thinkers of modem political society--Machiavelli, Locke, and Hobbes--articulated a philosophical base for modernity that tends towarda death-oriented culture. Modernity thus rests on a basis contrary to the culture of life to which Pope John Paul II calls Catholics and all people. Catholics and others of good will must work to overcome the culture of death by pronouncing the truth about human nature.
13. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Robert J. Phillips What Is the State of the American Regime: A Response
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The three papers interpret the American regime in different ways. Stack thinks that the American regime is the best of available alternatives, and may evenbe fundamentally healthy. Shankman finds the regime presently in ill health, but suggests how a neglected thread of American political thought (natural lawjurisprudence) could help to restore its health. Holloway, while silent on the direct issue of the American regime, argues that modernity is deeply flawed and thus suggests that the American regime is systemically unhealthy. Phillips addresses these papers in tum.
14. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Gary D. Glenn Commentary on "America, Modernity and the Culture of Death"
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The triumph of liberal secularism has insured that a culture of death has taken hold in modem America. Is this situation a necessary development fromAmerica's founding principles, or a departure from them? Holloway's argument that the culture of death is inherently rooted in modernity goes too far, because Stack and Shankman have shown how aspects of American foundational principles and documents can be used to support a culture of life. The problem is, as Holloway contends, a deep-seated one, but its seat may be human selfishness rather than philosophers' teachings.
part ii - articles
15. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Mary Jo Anderson Unmasking Dissent: The Demand for an American Catholic Church
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At the close of the Second Vatican Council modernist theologians, priests and scholars began building a future church based on neotheology. The Americandemocratic ideal of civic government was seen as the inspiration for Dignitatis Humanae, the Vatican II document on religious liberty. Under the banner ofJohn Courtney Murray's "American Proposition," dissident Catholics spent three decades laying the foundation for an American Catholic Church. Today the post-Christian American geography has scant tolerance for authority or hierarchy. The tenets and methodologies of the American church point to the future of Catholicism in America unless faithful Catholics defend orthodoxy.
16. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Jeremy M. Beer What Do We Mean by "Genetic Influence"? A Primer for Catholics with Special Reference to Homosexuality
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The concept of genetic influence is often misunderstood, especially within the debate over homosexuality. Some Catholic writers and many homosexualactivists and academics mistakenly believe that whether homosexuality is genetically influenced is related to its moral status and malleability. Here I tryto defuse this aspect of the debate by providing a precise defmition of genetic influence, reviewing its implications, and demonstrating its irrelevance to moral and therapeutic issues related to homosexuality. The Church does not compromise any aspect of its teaching by conceding that homosexuality may have a genetic component, but it must beware of deterministic interpretations of such research.
17. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Christopher O. Blum MacIntyre and the Catholic Historian
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Alisdair Macintyre's defense of the tradition of Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas offers a way to answer the question "What is the good of history?" By his use of dialectical reasoning in defense of the Thomist tradition, Macintyre helps Catholic historians to see that the good of history comes from its being a handmaiden to tradition. The writings of St. Bede the Venerable and John Henry Cardinal Newman are used as examples of how Catholic historians can know and draw upon their own tradition.
18. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Richard Cain From Human Nature to Authentic Subjectivity in Moral Theology: Insight or Oversight?
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This paper critically evaluates the claim of the moral theologian Michael Himes that it is possible (indeed preferable) to affirm a human subject without affirming a human nature. My analysis focuses on five problematic areas in Himes's argument. First, his argument seems to replace a philosophical anthropology based on a metaphysic of substances with one that is historically based. Using a historical argument to advocate this change begs the question. Second, Himes's argument seems to misunderstand Thomistic abstraction as reductionistic in essence and unable to account for historical change. Third, Himes's argument seems to give priority to a holistic theory of meaning over a foundationalist theory of meaning. Fourth, Himes's argument seems to exclude the possibility of the Church defining any moral teaching with certainty which contradicts Church teaching (Veritatis Splendor). Fifth, Himes's argument seems to use a Kantian epistemology which appears internally inconsistent.
19. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Stratford Caldecott The Social Thought of Hans Urs von Balthasar
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Hans Urs von Balthasar is one of the most influential theologians of the twentieth century, but often said to have no "social theology". The article seeks to correct that impression. His social theology may be discerned in his practical and theoretical work for the Secular Institutes, his critique of post Enlightenment culture and thinking (which provide the context for his remarks on Liberation theology) and the Christocentric basis for ethics, including social ethics. In Thea-Drama, he specifically addresses the nature of the social sciences in the light of his own Trinitarian and "kenotic" metaphysics.
20. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 5
Gerald E. DeMauro A Critique of the Moral Reasoning Literature from the Perspective of Catholic Moral Theology
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Moral reasoning literature is concerned with arriving at a decision, while the focus of Catholic moral theology is on judgment and discemment, beginning with revealed truth, reasoning through practical possibilities, and culminating in the application of moral norms to the particular situation. This paper reviews the history of moral reasoning theory in developmental psychology and contrasts it with the position of the Holy Father and Catholic moral teachings. In the end, the psychological literature fails to preclude decisions to do evil, such as commitment to abortion, as possible outcomes of "mature" reasoning, while the Catholic position views development as focused on prudence and human freedom, which preclude doing evil.