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part i: symposia: symposium: the ancients/moderns distinction: catholic perspectives
1. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Kenneth L. Grasso Introduction
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2. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Gary Glenn Whether Strauss’ Ancients/Moderns Reading of the History of Political Philosophy Unjustly Depreciates Christianity
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3. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
James V. Schall On The Conquest of Human Nature: Ancients, Moderns—Medievals, Futures
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4. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Cecilia R. Castillo Strauss and Christianity: Friends or Foes?
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5. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Kenneth L. Grasso Neither Ancient Nor Modern: The Distinctiveness of Catholic Social Thought
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6. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Robert P. Hunt Christianity, Leo Strauss, and the Ancients/Modern Distinction
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7. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Steven Brust Ancient and Modern: Natural Law and Universal Moral Principles
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8. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Eugene L. Nagy The Passion of Understanding: Preliminary Remarks on Strauss’ Quarrel Between Ancients and Moderns
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part i: symposia: symposium: the implications of catholic social teaching for economic science: an exchange between thomas storck and thomas e.woods, jr., with responses
9. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Thomas Storck A Challenge From Thomas Storck
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It is often claimed that there is a conflict between the ethical mandates of Catholic social teaching and the findings of economic science. However, the kind of economic analysis such critics adhere to is either the mainstream neoclassical (including the Chicago School) or the Austrian School, whose modes of economic analysis differ from that employed by the popes. Using examples from encyclicals, this article shows that the Supreme Pontiffs gave a more prominent place in their economic thinking to economic power and to institutions such as legal or cultural norms than to market forces. Instances are then given in which economic power is shown to have affected economic outcomes, and alternative schools are proposed as offering a type of economic analysis closer to that used by the popes.
10. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Thomas E. Woods, Jr. Catholic Social Teaching and the Market Economy Revisted: A Reply to Thomas Storck
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It is a violation of legitimate academic freedom to attempt to link Catholicism to a particular school of economic thought and shut down all further debate. Whether the realm of human choice, which economics describes, is subject to an array of cause-and-effect relationships is obviously a matter for human reason to determine. From there, reason can then investigate these relationships. Although economic policy has a moral dimension, economics as a positive scienceconsists merely of an edifice of cause-and-effect relationships, and to that extent is as autonomous as the purely descriptive sides of all other sciences.