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Displaying: 1-9 of 9 documents


articles
1. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
James Robert Brown Kitcher’s Mathematical Naturalism
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Recent years have seen a number of naturalist accounts of mathematics. Philip Kitcher’s version is one of the most important and influential. This paper includes a critical exposition of Kitcher’s views and a discussion of several issues including: mathematical epistemology, practice, history, the nature of applied mathematics. It argues that naturalism is an inadequate account and compares it with mathematical Platonism, to the advantage of the latter.
2. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Harold Robinson Some Externalist Strategies and Their Problems
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I claim that there are four major strands of argument for externalism and set out to discuss three of them. The four are: (A) That referential thoughts are object-dependent. This I do not discuss. (B) That the semantics of natural kind terms is externalist. (C) That all semantic content, even of descriptive terms, stems from the causal relations of representations to the things or properties they designate in the external world. (D) That, because meaning is a social product and no individual can capture the whole social practice that defines a concept, what the speaker means always outruns what he can know.I briefiy discuss (C) and (D) and conclude that they cannot be correct, because, if they were, the content of every thought would permanently transcend the refiective grasp of all thinkers. Then I discuss (B) and conclude that, though Putnam shows something interesting about natural kind terms -- namely that a real verbal definition requires science -- this has none of the consequences for philosophy of mind that it is normally supposed to have
3. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Robert Nola Nietzsche as Anti-Semitic Jewish Conspiracy Theorist
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Despite his strong objections to anti-Semitism, it will be argued that Nietzsche held a curious conspiracy theory about the Jews that is uniquely his own. Modern Jews, he declared, had the power to have mastery over Europe. And Ancient Jews exercised a remarkable power of self-preservation when they got others to accept the slave morality of Christianity. The second claim is shown to have a setting in Nietzsche’s own theory of the genealogy of morals. But it is argued that that theory is defective as an explanation of the genealogy of the Judeo-Christian morality Nietzsche despised. It is also argued that Nietzsche thinks that the noble lie, as opposed to the asceticism of truth seeking, is itself an expression of the “will to power”. But this raises a serious problem for what Nietzsche thought was the status of his own genealogical enterprise. Is his genealogy of morals an example of ascetic truth seeking to be depreciated? Or is it a (not so) “noble lie” that Nietzsche has tried to foist upon us? This is not a profound issue of Nietzsche hermeneutics that Nietzsche apologists might have us believe; rather it is an epistemological muddle on the part of Nietzsche.
4. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Ferenc Huoranszki On the Usefulness of Arts and Sciences
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The paper addresses the problem whether arts, sciences and humanities can be regarded as useful. First it examines the means-ends relation and argues that some means are not causally but rather constitutively connected to ends. Second, it specifies two dimensions along which the problem of values will be addressed. One is the issue about the relation between values and desirability, the other is the active and affective conceptions of valuation. Third the paper offers a concise reconstruction of the answers to the question of usefulness formulated during the enlightenment. It will be argued that traditionally usefulness was understood causally and not on the individual, but rather on the social level. In the final section the paper contends that values should be understood in terms of activities rather than in terms ofdesire satisfaction and that this interpretation can bring us closer to answering the question whether and why arts and sciences are useful.
5. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Edo Pivčević Equality and Morality
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Arguments for and against social equality have been advanced on various grounds, but the central issue remains to what extent, if at all, the pursuance of social equality should be seen as morally binding. Why should it be incumbent upon everyone to treat it as a moral virtue? The paper considers some of the best known egalitarian views and argues that the case tor equality as a morally binding principle has not been made.
book reviews
6. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Mladen Domazet Knowledge and its Limits
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7. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Snježana Prijić-Samaržija Bioetica: Analisi Filosofiche Liberali: (Bioethics: The Liberal Philosophical Analysis)
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8. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Iva Vlah Art and Knowledge
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in memoriam
9. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Tihomir Vukelja Srđan Lelas (1939-2003)
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