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1. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
An Interview with David Gauthier
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2. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
John Heawood Impossible Objects
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3. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
Tudor Eynon Darwin and Re-enchantment: a reply to Albert Van Eyken - the survival of the fittest
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4. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
Alan Carter Creating Co-operative Autonomy: or is the Dance of Shiva a form of maya?
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5. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
K.J. Payne Confidentiality and LA Law
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6. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
Alec Fisher Problems in Understanding and Analysing Arguments: Analysis of Dawkins on Religion versus Darwinism
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7. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
Mark Addis Does Language Matter to Philosophy?: Aristotle and Wittgenstein on the nature of philosophical enquiry
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8. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
Christopher Ormell A Modern Cogito 4: random versus perverse-random
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The first paper of this series (Cogito, 1992) outlined ‘the showdown phenomenon’: a live sequence of events of two distinct kinds, ‘red’ and ‘green’, which was experienced by the would-be predictor as absolutely and irreducibly unpredictable, because the predictor invariably got his or her predictions wrong. We can clearly and distinctly imagine this happening: so a perverse-random experience of this sort is evidently ‘logically possible’. This raises the question of the relation of the new sequences to ordinary ‘random’ sequences. In this paper an account is developed of the relationship of ‘perverse-randomness’ to ‘randomness’. Such an account may assist us in achieving a new, firmer conceptualization of ordinary probability, and hence in making sense of this notoriously elusive idea.
9. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
Jeff Mason Philosophy after Literature: a personal retrospective
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10. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
Malcolm France Tacit Self-Awareness
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