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Displaying: 1-10 of 27 documents


1. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Paget Henry Editor's Note
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tributes to wilson harris and v. s. naipaul
2. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Paget Henry Wilson Harris: A Quantum Tribute
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3. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Paget Henry V. S. Naipaul: A Half-made Tribute
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tributes to abiola irele
4. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Lewis Gordon For ‘Biola
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5. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Teodros Kiros It Was Many Years Ago, But, It Feels As If It Was Very Recent
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6. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Paget Henry Caribbean Reflections: For Abiola Irele
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with and about sylvia wynter
7. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Sylvia Wynter Beyond Liberal and Marxist Leninist Feminisms: Towards an Autonomous Frame of Reference
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This paper attempts to outline an autonomous feminism; a feminism with its own voice, and one that will transcend the binaries in which Marxism and liberalism are still caught. Its first step is to make clear the semio-linguistic foundations of all human social systems. These foundations consist of an open-ended set of social imaginary signifiers embedded in complex abduction or analogy-producing schemas, the creative conjugating of which makes possible the establishing of social orders such as families, monarchies or patriarchies. The second is to show that the semiotics of these orders require dominant or central signifiers, such as father or king, that must be supported by subordinate or peripheral ones. Third, the paper shows that women have consistently functioned as subordinate signifiers in these order-producing semio-linguistic codes. Fourth and finally, the paper details the semiotic difficulties of overthrowing this underlying governing code and thus breaking women out of their assigned subordinate positions.
8. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Anjuli I. Gunaratne “Writing Traumatic Time”: The Tragic Art and Thought of Sylvia Wynter
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This essay reads Sylvia Wynter’s only novel The Hills of Hebron (1962) as a modern tragedy, one that both challenges and builds upon Raymond Williams’s concept of modern tragedy. The essay’s main argument is that tragedy, as a literary form, and the tragic, as a philosophical concept, are fundamental to Wynter’s project of creating forms of counterpoieses. Engaging Wynter’s interlocution with tragedy is crucial for comprehending how she is able to transform loss into a condition of possibility, primarily for the writing of what she calls “traumatic time.” Instead of only blocking mental representation, traumatic loss in Wynter becomes the first gesture of a philosophical activity that makes presentable that which has been lost or abandoned to a state of ruin, an argument that Walter Benjamin, another writer in dark times, had earlier made in The Origin of German Tragic Drama. Occupying the temporality of the tragic, Wynter has always made the re-assumption of the past—“slave, slave masters and all,” as she says—central to her project of critiquing and dismantling the “descriptive statement” of Man as the only permissible version of the Human. In my reading of The Hills of Hebron, I show how the novel utilizes the aesthetic, particularly the medium of theatricality, as the grounds for a theoretical framework that makes, in a manner redolent of Antigone, “the wretched of the earth” presentable not as “symbolic death” but rather as allegories of resistance.
9. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Shawn Gonzalez Counter-Novels: Sylvia Wynter’s Fictional and Theoretical Disenchantment of the Novel Form
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While Sylvia Wynter emphasizes the written word’s capacity to transform our systems of organizing knowledge, she repeatedly questions the extent to which novels can have this transformative capacity. Both her theoretical writing and the plot of her 1962 novel The Hills of Hebron emphasize the novel’s limitations. However, Wynter does not totally reject the form. Instead, she reimagines the novel through the idea of the “counter-novel,” developed in conjunction with her close reading of Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man. This essay considers The Hills of Hebron as a counter-novel by analyzing the connections between novel’s two artist characters, The Hills of Hebron, and Wynter’s reading of The Invisible Man. Through this analysis, I argue that Wynter’s novel can be read as a substantial contribution to her theoretical corpus that has continued relevance to her challenge to transform dominant systems of knowledge production.
10. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Ege Selin Islekel Totalizing the Open: Roots and Boundary Markers in Wynter and Glissant
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This essay focuses on the spatial organization of the genre of ‘Man.’ In particular, I investigate the spatial attitudes through which the genre of Man emerges as a racialized, geographically determined, and gendered category. There are two main arcs of analysis provided: the first arc follows the relation between the space of exploration and the space of totalization. The second arc focuses on the role of boundary markers such as the ‘Other’ and the ‘Outside,’ in the spatial organization of Man. I argue, overall, that the totalitarian spatial attitude of the Modern State is formed on the basis of the transformation of the cosmogeny of Man from a spatially limited earth to one open to exploration. The racialized ladder of the State rests on such production of a spatial attitude that is at once open and totalitarian.