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Displaying: 1-6 of 6 documents


1. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 34 > Issue: 3
David Bevan In Memoriam Nigel John Roome, PhD (1953–2016)
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2. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 34 > Issue: 3
Vincent Blok, Bart Gremmen, Renate Wesselink Dealing with the Wicked Problem of Sustainability: The Role of Individual Virtuous Competence
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Over the past few years, individual competencies for sustainability have received a lot of attention in the educational, sustainability and business administration literature. In this article, we explore the meaning of two rather new and unfamiliar moral competencies in the field of corporate sustainability: normative competence and action competence. Because sustainability can be seen as a highly complex or ‘wicked’ problem, it is unclear what ‘normativity’ in the normative competence and ‘responsible action’ in the action competence actually mean. In this article, we raise the question how both these moral competencies have to be understood and how they are related to each other. We argue for a virtue ethics perspective on both moral competencies, because this perspective is able to take the wickedness of sustainability into account. It turns out that virtue ethics enables us to conceptualize normative competence and action competence as two aspects of one virtuous competence for sustainability.
3. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 34 > Issue: 3
Jennifer Kiefer Fenton "Anyone Can Be Angry, That’s Easy": A Normative Account of Anti-Corporate Anger
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Literature in feminist ethics and care ethics has emphasized the value of the emotions for resisting injustice, particularly anger, on the basis of their motivational force, epistemic insight, and normative content. I point to flaws in this approach and introduce an Aristotelian account of anti-corporate anger that establishes normative conditions for which to (1) evaluate the justifiability of the target of negative emotions and (2) evaluate the justifiability of the expression of negative emotions. I look to this account as the basis for defending a corporate culture account of corporate moral personhood. In closing I consider the Occupy Wall Street movement for further insights into the complex nature of anti-corporate anger and corporate moral personhood.
4. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 34 > Issue: 3
Christopher Pariso Bhopal and Engineering Ethics: Who is Responsible for Preventing Disasters?
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In this paper, I will provide a picture of the Bhopal disaster from an engineering ethics perspective. I find that the individual engineers involved in Bhopal acted ethically, for the most part, but that these actions failed to prevent the disaster for structural reasons. Nonetheless, there is no single level of analysis at which the problems that caused the Bhopal incident can be solved. Rather, a coordinated attempt must be made to change how individual engineers conceive of their work, how the professional community conceives of its role in supporting ethical conduct, and how societies use regulatory and judicial systems to provide the right incentives to the organizations that engineers work for.
5. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 34 > Issue: 3
Marc-Charles Ingerson, Bradley R. Agle, Thomas Donaldson, Paul C. Godfrey, Jared D. Harris Normative Stakeholder Capitalism: Getting from Here to There
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6. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 34 > Issue: 3
Notes on Contributors
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